Jeff Brady Jeff Brady is an NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.
Jeff Brady 2010
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Jeff Brady

Doby Photography /NPR
Jeff Brady 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jeff Brady

Correspondent, National Desk

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers energy issues, climate change and the mid-Atlantic region. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world.

Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has reported on the Texas oil business hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, the closing of a light bulb factory in Pennsylvania and a new generation of climate activists holding protests from Oregon to New York. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce.

In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter, and in commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University). In 2018 SOU honored Brady with its annual "Distinguished Alumni" award.

Story Archive

Steam rises from the Miller coal power plant in Adamsville, Ala., in April. An industry group says a climate plan in Congress would shut down all U.S. coal plants by 2030 or earlier. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Congress May Soon Pass The Country's Most Significant Climate Change Legislation Ever

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Ida's Remnants Devastated The Northeast. Climate Scientists Saw It Coming

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Power Grids Feel The Pressure Of Intense Storms Driven By Climate Change

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Despite The Focus On Fighting Climate Change, U.S. Demand For Coal Surged This Summer

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Proposed Clean Energy Standard Could End Power Plant Greenhouse Gas Emissions By 2035

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In July wildfire smoke hung over St. Mary Lake in Glacier National Park in Montana (right). The haze muted the bright views amateur photographer Heather Duchow remembered from and anniversary trip 15 years ago (left). Heather Duchow hide caption

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Heather Duchow

Summertime And Vacationing Isn't Easy. Blame It On Climate Change

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Wind turbines in a field in Adair, Iowa. Democrats' budget deal would use financial carrots and sticks to encourage utilities to shift to clean energy. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Democrats' Budget Plan Pushes A Shift To Clean Energy. Here's How It Would Work

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Veterinarian Belinda Burwell began receiving reports of sick songbirds in Virginia last month. This male blue jay was completely blind and was hopping in circles because of dizziness. He had to be euthanized. Belinda Burwell hide caption

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Belinda Burwell

Exxon Mobil has apologized after one of its lobbyists talked about undermining climate action in an undercover video. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

A wall-mounted thermostat in a California home. New research finds households that can least afford it are spending more than they have to on electricity. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

Keystone XL Pipeline Developer Cancels Project, Ending Decade-Long Battle

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