Jeff Brady Jeff Brady is an NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.
Jeff Brady 2010
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Jeff Brady

Doby Photography /NPR
Jeff Brady 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jeff Brady

Correspondent, National Desk

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers energy issues, climate change and the mid-Atlantic region. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world.

Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has reported on the Texas oil business hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, the closing of a light bulb factory in Pennsylvania and a new generation of climate activists holding protests from Oregon to New York. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce.

In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter, and in commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University). In 2018 SOU honored Brady with its annual "Distinguished Alumni" award.

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A wall-mounted thermostat in a California home. New research finds households that can least afford it are spending more than they have to on electricity. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

Keystone XL Pipeline Developer Cancels Project, Ending Decade-Long Battle

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A storage yard in Montana contains pipe that was to be used in the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. The developer has now canceled the controversial project. Al Nash/Bureau of Land Management via AP hide caption

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Al Nash/Bureau of Land Management via AP

Developer Abandons Keystone XL Pipeline Project, Ending Decade-Long Battle

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Shalanda Baker listens during a confirmation hearing Tuesday to be Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact for the Department of Energy. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

'Energy Justice' Nominee Brings Activist Voice To Biden's Climate Plans

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Pictures of plaintiffs fly outside the court in The Hague, Netherlands, before Wednesday's ruling ordering Royal Dutch Shell to rein in its carbon emissions. Thousands of citizens joined the suit charging that Shell's fossil fuel investments endanger lives. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, joined by Sens. Ed Markey (left) and Martin Heinrich, discusses legislation Wednesday to reimpose regulations to reduce methane pollution from oil and gas wells. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Votes To Restore Regulations On Climate-Warming Methane Emissions

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U.S. Steps Back Into Leadership Role To Battle Global Climate Change

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U.S. To Pledge To Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions In Half

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How Does The Biden Administration Plan To Reach Its Clean Energy Goal?

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Biden Is Pushing For A Major Expansion Of Offshore Wind Energy

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Three of Deepwater Wind's turbines stand off Block Island, R.I., in 2016. The Biden administration is pushing for a sharp increase in offshore wind energy development along the East Coast. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Electrical grid transmission towers in Pasadena, Calif. Major power outages from extreme weather have risen dramatically in the past two decades. John Antczak/AP hide caption

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John Antczak/AP

It's Not Just Texas. The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

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Electrical grid transmission towers in Pasadena, Calif. Major power outages from extreme weather have risen dramatically in the past two decades. John Antczak/AP hide caption

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John Antczak/AP

Advocates Call For Updated Power Infrastructure In Light Of Weather-Related Outages

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

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