Jess Jiang Jess Jiang is a Senior Supervising Editor for Planet Money.
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Jess Jiang

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Headshot of Jess Jiang
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Jess Jiang

Senior Supervising Editor, Planet Money

Jess Jiang is a Senior Supervising Editor for Planet Money. Previously, Jiang was a producer for NPR's podcast Rough Translation, where she helped tell deeply personal stories like the delicate friendship between a Chinese mom and the American surrogate she hires to carry her child, a civilian who marries a veteran and learns more about war than she ever imagined and a mom whose child is sure he belongs in a different culture.

Jiang has also worked as a producer for Planet Money. In 2014, she was part of the team that won an Emmy for the T-shirt project. She followed the start of the t-shirt's journey, from cotton farms in Mississippi to factories in Indonesia. But her biggest prize has been getting to drive a forklift, back hoe and a 35-ton digger for a story. Jiang got her start in public radio at Studio 360—though, if you search hard enough, you can uncover a podcast she made back in college.

She earned a degree in economics and environmental studies at Yale University.

Story Archive

Friday

Israeli soldiers are seen near the Gaza Strip border in southern Israel, Monday, March 4, 2024. Ohad Zwigenberg/AP hide caption

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Ohad Zwigenberg/AP

How much of your tax dollars are going to Israel and Ukraine

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Wednesday

How Big Steel in the U.S. fell

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Friday

Friday

Wednesday

LEFT: Maria Lares is a longtime teacher and PTA Treasurer at Villacorta Elementary in La Puente, CA. RIGHT: Sophia Fabela (left) and Samantha Nicole Tan (right) are two students at Villacorta who consider themselves pretty good sales kids. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

The secret world behind school fundraisers and turning kids into salespeople

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Wednesday

Friday

Wednesday

Friday

Wednesday

Dollarizing Argentina

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Wednesday

Planet Money hosts a Thanksgiving feast - of food and economics. Sam Yellowhorse Kesler/NPR hide caption

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Sam Yellowhorse Kesler/NPR

Wednesday

A worker prepares to weld a steel structure at a construction site in Beijing on May 8, 2021. Greg Baker/AFP hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP

Friday

As head of the FTC, Lina Khan is bringing a case against Amazon that echoes her law school paper on the tech company's monopoly power. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Friday

Bridget Bennett/Alex Wong/Getty Images

All you can eat economics

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Friday

Wednesday

Several United Airlines flight attendants wearing "CHAOS" T-shirts at a meeting to decide plans for a potential strike in 2001. CHAOS—an acronym for "Create Havoc Around Our System"—is a strike strategy first used in 1993 during a labor dispute between Alaska Airlines and their flight attendants' union. The strategy can keep a company guessing about when, where or even how a strike might happen. Tim Boyle/Newsmakers/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Newsmakers/Getty Images

The flight attendants of CHAOS

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Wednesday

Tatyana Deryugina/Gies College of Business

The natural disaster economist

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Wednesday

"Based on a true story"

When a group of amateur investors rallied around the stock for GameStop back in 2021, the story blew up the internet. News outlets around the world, including us here at Planet Money, rushed in to explain why the stock for this retail video game company was suddenly skyrocketing, at times by as much as 1700% in value, and what that meant for the rest of us.

"Based on a true story"

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Friday

Wednesday

A portrait of Prince taken by Lynn Goldsmith (left) in 1981 and 16 silk-screened images Andy Warhol later created using the photo as a reference (right). Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

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Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Andy Warhol Supreme Court case and what it means for the future of art

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Friday

CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images

Europe gets more vacations than the U.S. Here are some reasons why.

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Friday

LILLIAN SUWANRUMPHA/AFP via Getty Images

A tarot card reading for the U.S. economy

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Thursday

Friday

Mouse Cursor Clicking Accept for Terms and Conditions Agreement. 3D illustration ninefotostudio/Shutterstock hide caption

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ninefotostudio/Shutterstock

Surprise, you just signed a contract! How hidden contracts took over the internet

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