Adrian Florido Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team.
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Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido

Reporter, Code Switch

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he covers race, identity, and culture.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Florido was a reporter at Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, where he covered public and community health. Prior to that, he was at KPBS in San Diego, reporting on the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration, and demographics as a member of the Fronteras Desk, a team of reporters covering the changing Southwest. He began his journalism career reporting on people and neighborhoods at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on the U.S. and Latin America. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's a runner and loves good coffee and great music. He has a particular love of traditional string music from the Mexican state of Veracruz, a style often called Son Jarocho. He travels to Veracruz as often as possible to learn from master musicians. He's also one of the organizers of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates San Diego from Tijuana.

You can listen to Florido's stories here, and follow him on Twitter at @adrianflorido.

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Story Archive

'Tales Of Clamor' Tells The Emotional Reckoning Of Japanese-Americans After WWII

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Remains of La Pescaderia, a community center in Loiza, Puerto Rico. The island will receive nearly $20 billion from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to help rebuild after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island in September 2017. Erika P. Rodríguez for NPR hide caption

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Erika P. Rodríguez for NPR

Puerto Ricans Concerned That $20 Billion Recovery Plan Is 'Not For The People'

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Puerto Rico's Fine Arts Center. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

'Hamilton' Arrives In Puerto Rico, Bringing A Bit Of Controversy With It

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News Brief: Trump Inaugural Committee, Border Wall, Possible Ban On Cockfighting

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A rooster, bred for fighting, sits inside a cage at a breeding farm in Cabo Rojo, southwestern Puerto Rico. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

Puerto Ricans Angry Over Impending Ban On Cockfighting

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The Lares Municipal Cemetery has been closed since Hurricane Maria caused a landslide that damaged nearly 1,800 tombs at the cemetery's far end. Visits and new burials have been prohibited ever since. Erika P. Rodriguez for NPR hide caption

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Erika P. Rodriguez for NPR

'My Father Is In There': Anguish Builds In Puerto Rico Mountains Over Decimated Tombs

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Puerto Rico's governor pledged to run a transparent recovery process. But as billions of dollars are on the way, many people say there are indications that transparency may not be a top priority. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

Advocates Fight 'Culture of Secrecy' In Post-Hurricane Puerto Rico

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Puerto Ricans Want Their Government To Be More Transparent

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A year after Hurricane Maria touched down in September 2017, the island is still recovering. On Tuesday lawyers for the government admitted they had not yet overhauled the island's emergency response plans for the next major hurricane. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Valentin/Getty Images

Listen: Court Hearing

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Brian Bartlett from the South Florida Search and Rescue team checks in on Tom Garcia, who stayed in his home through Hurricane Michael. Experts say people's decisions to stay are almost always carefully considered. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Singer Alberto Carrión performs Amanecer Borincano, his song about sunrise over Puerto Rico, at the point where Hurricane Maria made landfall one year ago. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

Where Hurricane Maria First Made Landfall, Songs Memorialize The Tragedy

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One Year After Hurricane, How Puerto Rico Has Changed

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