Adrian Florido Adrian Florido is a national correspondent for NPR covering race and identity in America.
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Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido

Correspondent, National Desk

Adrian Florido is a national correspondent for NPR covering race and identity in America.

He was previously a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team.

His beat takes him around the country to report on major flashpoints over race and racism, but also on the quieter nuances and complexities of how race is lived and experienced in the United States.

In 2018 he was based in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reporting on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria while on a yearlong special assignment for NPR's National Desk.

Before joining NPR in 2015, he was a reporter at NPR member station KPCC in Los Angeles, covering public health. Before that, he was the U.S.-Mexico border reporter at KPBS in San Diego. He began his career as a staff writer at the Voice of San Diego.

Adrian is a Southern California native. He was news editor of the Chicago Maroon, the student paper at the University of Chicago, where he studied history. He's also an organizer of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates the two countries.

Story Archive

The evolving grief of Uvalde residents

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J. Michael Luttig, former U.S. Court of Appeals judge for the Fourth Circuit, arrives to testify before the House committee that is investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Former federal judge warns of danger to American democracy

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The trees that George Garza planted as a new teacher in the 1960s today offer shade at the memorial to the victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Mourning a Mexican-American tragedy, under the shade of pecan trees

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Families of Uvalde victims turn from grief to action

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Robb Elementary in Uvalde was integral to Mexican-American equality in the city

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New detail raises more questions about the botched response to the shooting in Uvalde

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An aerial view of Robb Elementary School and the makeshift memorial for the shooting victims in Uvalde. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

What Robb Elementary School has meant in Uvalde's history of Mexican activism

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Children were calling 911 from within the Uvalde classroom as police waited to enter

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Uvalde parents question the police's response to the deadly school shooting

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In the fight against white nationalism, white people are key

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A mural of George Floyd at the intersection where he was murdered in Minneapolis, Minn. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

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Biden denounces white supremacy while in Buffalo to visit shooting victims' families

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Tops is more than a Buffalo supermarket

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Protests in Sri Lanka have turned violent amid power, food and medicine shortages

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