Bill McQuay Bill McQuay is an audio producer with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.
Bill McQuay
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Bill McQuay

What Would Aliens Make Of NASA's Voyager?

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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Moraine Park is a grassy valley inside Rocky Mountain National Park. Wes Lindamood/NPR hide caption

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Wes Lindamood/NPR

Beyond Sightseeing: You'll Love The Sound Of America's Best Parks

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

How Sound Reveals The Invisible Within Us

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How Sound Shaped The Evolution Of Your Brain

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Squirrels closely mimic bird warning calls and help spread the alarm through the forest that hawks, owls or other predators are nearby. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Squirrels Mimic Bird Alarms To Foil The Enemy

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Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Oelman

Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

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African forest elephants stampede in the Central African Republic jungle. Courtesy of Cornell Lab or Ornithology hide caption

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Courtesy of Cornell Lab or Ornithology

To Decode Elephant Conversation, You Must Feel The Jungle Rumble

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Humpback whales and tanker in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts Bay. Green Fire Productions/Flickr hide caption

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Green Fire Productions/Flickr

Listening To Whale Migration Reveals A Sea Of Noise Pollution, Too

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Humpback whale and calf, off the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico. Reinhard Dirscherl/Look-foto/Corbis hide caption

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Reinhard Dirscherl/Look-foto/Corbis

It Took A Musician's Ear To Decode The Complex Song In Whale Calls

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

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Kalron and his team have set up video cameras that transmit real-time images of the bai via satellite. Courtesy of Maisha Consulting hide caption

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Courtesy of Maisha Consulting

Former Commando Turns Conservationist To Save Elephants Of Dzanga Bai

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A female forest elephant charges, in Dzanga-Sangha Special Reserve in the Central African Republic. Michael K. Nichols/National Geographic/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael K. Nichols/National Geographic/Getty Images

Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

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Mortality and the Gift of the Moment

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The Mountain Home of a Warrior God

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