Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

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Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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Linda Fairstein, seen at an event in New York City in 2004, parlayed her fame as a prosecutor into a prolific run as a crime novelist. Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images hide caption

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The sign for a Barnes & Noble bookstore hangs above the entrance to one of its locations in Brooklyn earlier this year. The book retailer and Elliott Management Corp. announced Friday that they have agreed to a sale price of about $683 million. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Tayari Jones speaks onstage at the Women In The World Summit earlier this year in in New York City. On Wednesday, Jones' novel An American Marriage won the prestigious Women's Prize for Fiction. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Horwitz, seen hitchhiking in Australia in 1986, wrote about the experience later in his book One for the Road: Hitchhiking Through the Australian Outback. Horwitz, who would go on to win the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting, died Monday at the age of 60. Philip Wayne Lock/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Lonnie G. Bunch III speaks during the 2016 dedication of the National Museum of African History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Bunch, the museum's founding director, will be taking over as secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in mid-June. Astrid Riecken/Getty Images hide caption

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Jordan Binnington, starting goaltender for the St. Louis Blues, looks on during the first game of the Blues' playoff series with the San Jose Sharks earlier this month. Binnington may be a rookie, but he's taking part in a tradition that dates back decades. Christian Petersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenyan author Binyavanga Wainaina, seen here during a January 2014 interview in Nairobi, has died at the age of 48. A founder of the Nairobi-based literary network Kwani?, Wainaina had come out as gay in a country where homosexuality was illegal. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anita Hill speaks with journalist Bob Woodward before the 2019 PEN America Literary Gala in New York City, where they were both recognized with awards Tuesday. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi's 'Call Me Zebra' Wins PEN/Faulkner Prize

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John Singleton attends last year's American Black Film Festival Honors in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Boyz n the Hood director died after suffering a stroke. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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John Singleton, Pioneering Director Of 'Boyz N The Hood,' Dies At 51

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Anthony Burgess poses for a photograph in 1973, two years after the release of the film adaptation of A Clockwork Orange — and right around the time he was working on the recently unearthed manuscript. AP hide caption

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