Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

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Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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Story Archive

A weather-worn sign protesting the Keystone XL pipeline stands in Fullerton, Neb. On Friday the state's Supreme Court dealt the pipeline's protesters a significant defeat, approving an alternate route that runs through Nebraska. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Li Ka-shing speaks at a news conference in Hong Kong last year. The nonagenarian tycoon purchased full-page ads in local newspapers warning against violence — but at least one scholar of Chinese language sees a secret message of support for the protesters. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Several of the fires burning in the Amazon rainforest can be seen even from space, as evidenced by this satellite image provided by NASA this month. Brazil's National Institute for Space Research said the country has seen a record number of wildfires this year. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Octavio Dotel, then a pitcher for the Kansas City Royals, seen during a 2007 game. Dominican Republic authorities arrested the former MLB player, saying both he and ex-infielder Luis Castillo were linked with an alleged drug trafficker. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Protesters gather for a rally Sunday in Hong Kong. Many of the pro-democracy demonstrators have brandished umbrellas in a nod to a symbol widely used during the semiautonomous city's massive 2014 protests. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

A sea of fog advances on the Golden Gate Bridge during a late winter twilight in 2016. On Saturday, the operators of FogCam said the long-running webcam at San Francisco State University will sunset "forever" at the end of August. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The End Is Nigh For FogCam, Billed As The Internet's Oldest Running Webcam

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Questions Surround Epstein's Death

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After Long Legal Fight, Rapper Meek Mill Is Granted A Retrial

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Leah Esguerra (right), who is credited with being the first social worker installed directly at a public library, strolls through the fifth floor of the San Francisco Public Library's main branch, joined by the library's health and safety associates (from left to right) Sidney Grindstaff, Jennifer Keys and Cary Latham. Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library hide caption

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Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library

Your Local Library May Have A New Offering In Stock: A Resident Social Worker

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At a ceremony Monday at the White House, President Trump defended his racist tweets against Democratic lawmakers. The language used in that tweet has a long history connected with nativist political movements. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Go Back Where You Came From': The Long Rhetorical Roots Of Trump's Racist Tweets

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R. Kelly Arrested, Faces Federal Charges In Chicago And Brooklyn

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