Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

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Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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A security camera and flag adorn the entrance to the Russian Embassy in London. On Tuesday, lawmakers slammed the British government for failing to look into possible Russian interference in U.K. politics. Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images

Firefighters work to extinguish the blaze at the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul in Nantes on Saturday. The fire shattered stained-glass windows and sent black smoke billowing from between its two towers. Romain Boulanger/AP hide caption

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Romain Boulanger/AP

The European Court of Justice found that Privacy Shield — which counts Facebook and Twitter among its participants — failed to protect the data privacy rights of Europeans. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Contractors on Thursday remove Marc Quinn's statue, A Surge of Power (Jen Reid) 2020, after its temporary stint atop the plinth dedicated to slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol. Officials in the British city said the sculpture had been set up without their permission. Ben Birchall/AP hide caption

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Ben Birchall/AP

A new sculpture by local artist Marc Quinn, depicting Black Lives Matter protester Jen Reid, stands on the plinth where the Edward Colston statue used to rest in Bristol. Matthew Horwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Horwood/Getty Images

Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, shown testifying at a June 10 House Judiciary Committee hearing prompted by the death of George Floyd, announced he has filed a civil lawsuit against "the City of Minneapolis and police officers" on behalf of Floyd's family. Mandel Ngan /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan /AFP via Getty Images

Roger Stone, seen here leaving a federal courthouse earlier this year in Washington, D.C., will not have to serve his three-year prison sentence for lying to Congress, witness tampering and obstruction of justice. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters clash with police Tuesday night in front of the National Assembly building in Belgrade, Serbia. Oliver Bunic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oliver Bunic/AFP via Getty Images

A statue of John Harvard, namesake of the university, overlooks the campus earlier this year. Harvard University joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in suing the federal government over its policies on international students Wednesday. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

President Trump, seen last week at the White House, is the subject of another scathing book that also faced a court battle. The release date for the new book by his niece, Mary Trump, has been moved up to July 14. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images