Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

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Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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Kenyan author Binyavanga Wainaina, seen here during a January 2014 interview in Nairobi, has died at the age of 48. A founder of the Nairobi-based literary network Kwani?, Wainaina had come out as gay in a country where homosexuality was illegal. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

Anita Hill speaks with journalist Bob Woodward before the 2019 PEN America Literary Gala in New York City, where they were both recognized with awards Tuesday. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi's 'Call Me Zebra' Wins PEN/Faulkner Prize

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John Singleton attends last year's American Black Film Festival Honors in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Boyz n the Hood director died after suffering a stroke. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

John Singleton, Pioneering Director Of 'Boyz N The Hood,' Dies At 51

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Anthony Burgess poses for a photograph in 1973, two years after the release of the film adaptation of A Clockwork Orange — and right around the time he was working on the recently unearthed manuscript. AP hide caption

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AP

David Brion Davis, seen in this undated portrait released by Yale University, died Sunday at the age of 92. The volumes of his seminal trilogy, The Problem of Slavery, won a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award and several other prestigious honors. Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP hide caption

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Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP

Tayari Jones holds up her Aspen Words Literary Prize, which she won Thursday in New York City for her novel An American Marriage. Joe Carrotta/Courtesy of Aspen Words hide caption

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Joe Carrotta/Courtesy of Aspen Words

Lori Loughlin exits a courthouse in Boston last week. The actress and 15 other parents were hit with a second superseding indictment Tuesday, increasing the legal jeopardy they face for their alleged role in the college admissions cheating scandal. Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images

A large reproduction of an Oscar statuette stands at a luncheon earlier this year in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Department of Justice confirmed that it had sent a letter to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which presents the Oscars, saying it has antitrust concerns with some proposed rule changes. Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP hide caption

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Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP

Jussie Smollett leaves a Chicago courthouse Tuesday, shortly after prosecutors dropped all charges against him. The move was met with anger from local authorities and confusion from plenty of onlookers. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

Jussie Smollett, seen earlier this month outside a courthouse in Chicago, has stood in the eye of a squall of controversy since filing his police report in late January. Amid all the very public tumult, things have likely gotten rather confusing for the average news-watcher. Matt Marton/AP hide caption

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Matt Marton/AP

Jussie Smollett addresses the media after appearing in a Chicago courtroom on Tuesday. The Empire actor reasserted his innocence after prosecutors dropped the charges against him, but Chicago police are upset with the decision. Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images hide caption

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Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

The 2019 Whiting Award recipients (clockwise from top left): poet Kayleb Rae Candrilli, poet Tyree Daye, novelist Hernan Diaz, playwright Michael R. Jackson, fiction writer Terese Marie Mailhot, nonfiction writer Nadia Owusu, playwright Lauren Yee, poet Vanessa Angelica Villarreal, novelist Merrit Tierce and fiction writer Nafissa Thompson-Spires. Courtesy of the Whiting Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of the Whiting Foundation