Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

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Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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Singer R. Kelly was indicted on 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse on Feb. 22. In this photo, he performs in Atlantic City, N.J., on April 9, 2006. Donald Kravitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Kravitz/Getty Images

R. Kelly Under Arrest On 10 Charges Of Aggravated Criminal Sexual Abuse In Illinois

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Empire actor Jussie Smollett leaves the Cook County Jail in Chicago Thursday after posting bond. On Friday, the show's producers announced that they would be removing his character from the final episodes of this season. Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images hide caption

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Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

Rochelle Washington (left) and Latresa Scaff (right) look on Thursday in New York City, as attorney Gloria Allred holds up a picture of them as teenagers on the night R. Kelly allegedly made sexual advances on them. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Jussie Smollett leaves the Cook County Jail following his release Thursday in Chicago. Smollett was charged with filling a false police report after he said he was attacked by two men who shouted racist and anti-gay slurs. Kamil Krzaczynski/AP hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/AP

Jussie Smollett 'Took Advantage Of The Pain And Anger Of Racism,' Police Say

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Actor and singer Jussie Smollett, seen at an Empire event in 2016, has been charged with disorderly conduct for allegedly filing a false police report about being the victim of a bias-motivated attack. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

The 2019 Aspen Words Literary Prize shortlist (clockwise from top left): There There, by Tommy Orange; Friday Black, by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah; An American Marriage, by Tayari Jones; Brother, by David Chariandy; and Gun Love, by Jennifer Clement. Courtesy of the publisher/Photo illustration by NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of the publisher/Photo illustration by NPR

German designer Karl Lagerfeld died in Paris, according to fashion house LVMH, owner of Fendi. He is seen here at the end of Chanel's 2019 women's ready-to-wear show in Paris, where a beach was created to show off Lagerfeld's collection. Stephane Mahe/Reuters hide caption

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Stephane Mahe/Reuters

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam places hand over his heart at a funeral for a state trooper Saturday in Chilhowie, Va., during one of his first public appearances since the blackface scandal broke. Steve Helber/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Helber/Pool/Getty Images

Virginia State Leaders Hold On Tight To Office After More Than A Week Of Turmoil

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The Latest On Virginia's Political Scandals

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Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax presides over the state Senate at the Capitol on Thursday. One day later, a second woman came forward with sexual assault allegations against the politician. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

People dressed in blackface are seen in the 1968 edition of The Bomb, Virginia Military Institute's yearbook. Virginia Military Institute Yearbook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Virginia Military Institute Yearbook/Screenshot by NPR

Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax speaks to the media Monday in Richmond, Va., about the sexual assault allegation from 2004. Logan Cyrus/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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