Colin Dwyer Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR.
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Colin Dwyer

Stephen Voss/NPR
Colin Dwyer 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Colin Dwyer

Reporter, Newsdesk

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

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A bus departs from the dock where the Diamond Princess cruise ship sits under quarantine with its thousands of passengers and crew. Japanese authorities said Friday that some older passengers who tested negative for the coronavirus were allowed to disembark. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Manhattan Criminal Court on Monday, during the defense portion of his rape trial. Six women took the stand to say they were sexually assaulted by Weinstein — then Weinstein's legal team got the opportunity to have its say. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Penguins gather near a Chilean research station on the Antarctic Peninsula, not far from the Argentine station that reported the record high temperature Thursday. World meteorological experts still need to verify the record, but it does fit with a broader pattern of warming on the continent. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

It Was 65 Degrees In Antarctica This Week

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The two bluffs that inspired the name of the Bears Ears National Monument, seen at sunset outside Blanding, Utah. On Thursday, more than two years after the Trump administration announced plans to shrink the monument and others, federal managers have finalized the new land use plans. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein arrives at a Manhattan courtroom for his rape trial on Monday. This week, prosecutors wrapped up their case against the former Hollywood producer. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Travelers wait in the security line at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security warned the state that it was freezing residents' access to Global Entry and similar programs, citing a recent state law that allows undocumented immigrants to obtain licenses. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored off the coast of Japan. At least 10 people on the ship have been diagnosed with coronavirus, and more than 3,000 of their fellow passengers remain in quarantine, according to Japan's health minister. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images

A Turkish military convoy passes through the Syrian town of Dana, in Idlib province near the Turkish-Syrian border, on Sunday. It is there, in northwestern Syria, that friction between the country and neighboring Turkey has flared into direct violence. Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images

Officials lower and remove the Union Jack from the European Parliament building in Brussels on Friday. As the U.K. prepared to bring to an end its decades-long membership in the European Union, the bloc's top officials on Friday pledged to continue playing a prominent role despite the loss of a powerful affiliate. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Smoke rises after South Korean soldiers set a blast to remove land mines in the Demilitarized Zone in 2002. The Korean Peninsula had been the last region the U.S. military was allowed to use the weapon — until Friday, when the Trump administration lifted the Obama-era restriction. Yun Jai-Hyoung/AP hide caption

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Yun Jai-Hyoung/AP

The Ain al-Asad air base, northwest of Baghdad, was one of the Iraqi bases targeted by Iranian missile strikes seen earlier this month. Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images