Scott Detrow Scott Detrow is a White House correspondent for NPR.
Headshot of Scott Detrow, 2018
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Scott Detrow

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Headshot of Scott Detrow, 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Scott Detrow

White House Correspondent

Scott Detrow is a White House correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail, covering the Democratic side of the 2020 presidential campaign.

Before NPR, Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

Story Archive

The Biden administration has to change course on climate change after Court ruling

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As The Supreme Court Ends Its Term, The Christian Nationalist Right Keeps Winning

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The Supreme Court curbs the EPA's power to protect the environment

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Supreme Court Curbs Environmental Protection Agency's Power To Protect Environment

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Anit-abortion activists hold signs outside the US Supreme Court after overturning of Roe Vs. Wade, in Washington, DC, on June 24, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel Steven Engel, former Acting U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and former Acting U.S. Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue are sworn in to testify during the fifth of eight planned public hearings of the U.S. House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the United States Capitol. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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In this file photo from the Saudi Royal Palace, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks during the Gulf Cooperation Council in Riyadh on Dec. 14, 2021. Bandar Aljaloud/AP hide caption

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Bandar Aljaloud/AP

Politics chat: Biden struggles with inflation; Jan. 6 committee hearings continue

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Biden has changed his tune on Saudi Arabia

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Federal Inquiry Cast A Shadow On Solar Power Growth. Now, Biden's Granted A Reprieve.

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