Scott Detrow Scott Detrow is a White House correspondent for NPR.
Headshot of Scott Detrow, 2018
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Scott Detrow

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Headshot of Scott Detrow, 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Scott Detrow

White House Correspondent

Scott Detrow is a White House correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail, covering the Democratic side of the 2020 presidential campaign.

Before NPR, Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

Story Archive

With Biden's Legacy Teetering, Democrats Struggle To Overcome Divisions

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Far-Right Rally Is A Reminder The U.S. Hasn't Reckoned With January 6th Attack

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Here Are The Tough Questions Congress Asked About Biden's Afghanistan Withdrawal

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Vice President Kamala Harris Speaks At Shanksville, Pennsylvania, 9/11 Memorial Event

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Former President George W. Bush Speaks At Shanksville, Pennsylvania, Memorial

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State Health Officials Discuss Biden's Strategy To Slow The Delta Variant

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White House Climate Advisor Says Despite Recent Disasters, Don't Lose Hope

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Jack Grandcolas, who lost his pregnant wife on United Flight 93, sits near his home in Pebble Beach, Calif. Twenty years after Sept. 11, he is still working through his loss. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

How Mourning Has Been Different For Each Of These 9/11 Families

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Richard and Lori Guadagno around 2001. Tim Lambert hide caption

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Tim Lambert

Her Brother Died On Flight 93. She Still Sees Him Surfacing In Small Ways

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2 Years Since Call With Trump, Ukrainian President Met With Biden At The White House

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After Two Decades And More Than A 150,000 Dead, America Has Left Afghanistan

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