Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

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Biden Welcomes Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga To White House

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Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks to media in Tokyo this month. Suga will take part in a Friday summit meeting with President Biden, the first foreign leader to meet the president face to face. Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP

China To Loom Large At Biden's Summit With Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga

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Biden To Meet Japanese Counterpart Yoshihide Suga At The White House

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People in Tokyo protest a decision to start releasing into the ocean massive amounts of treated wastewater from the Fukushima nuclear plant. The plant was damaged in a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Japan To Dump Wastewater From Wrecked Fukushima Nuclear Plant Into Pacific Ocean

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Japan's Vaccine Rollout Lags Other Developed Economies

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Azusa Iwashimizu (right) and other members of Japan women's national football team run as torchbearers in the first leg of the torch relay for Tokyo Olympics on Thursday in Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Du Xiaoyi/AP hide caption

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Du Xiaoyi/AP

North Korea fired short-range missiles this past weekend, just days after the sister of Kim Jong Un threatened the United States and South Korea for holding joint military exercises. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Ballistic Missile Launch Near Japan Pushes Tensions With North Korea

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On Asia Tour, U.S. Secretary Of State Blinken Meets With Local Journalists

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (second from left) speaks as U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin (left), South Korean Foreign Minister Chung Eui-yong (second from right) and South Korean Defense Minister Suh Wook (right) listen during a joint press conference Thursday after their meeting in Seoul, South Korea. Lee Jin-man/Pool/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/Pool/AP

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, left, elbow bumps with Japan's Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, center, as Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Japanese Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi watch after a joint news conference in Tokyo Tuesday. Kazuhiro Nogi/AP hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AP

On Asia Trip, Biden Administration Seeks To Restore Alliances

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Repairing Damage And Public Trust 10 Years After Japan's Triple Disaster

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South Korean Military take part in a drill near the Korean Demilitarized Zone in Paju, South Korea, June 18, 2020. Seung-il Ryu/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Seung-il Ryu/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Myanmar people and supporters march during on Feb. 14 in Tokyo to protest the military coup. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Japan's Myanmar Dilemma: How Hard To Push Against Military Coup Leaders?

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