Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
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Anthony Kuhn

Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Bejing, China, covering the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Throughout his coverage he has taken an interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

During a previous tour in China from 2006-2010, Kuhn covered the Beijing Olympics, and the devastating Sichuan earthquake that preceded it. He looked at life in the heart of Lhasa, Tibet's capital, and the recovery of Japan's northeast coast after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings, and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Previous to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French Literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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South Korea's Sports Prestige Gets Eclipsed By Sexual Abuse Against Female Athletes

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An employee of Tokyo Electric Power Co. works at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant to decontaminate the area after the 2011 nuclear meltdown. A Vietnamese laborer in Japan on a training program says he was also put to work cleaning up the site, but with inadequate gear. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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South Korean journalist and former North Korean defector Kim Myong Song speaks at a cafe in Seoul. The government's decision to ban him from covering an inter-Korean meeting raised concerns about press freedom. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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For A North Korean Defector Turned Journalist, Warming Ties Are Cause For Worry

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North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un Kicks Off New Year With Address And A Warning To U.S.

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North Korean Leader Addresses Policy Issues In New Year's Address

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Japan Plans To Resume Commercial Whaling Operations

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The interior of the DMZ train, a three-car tourist train. It is decorated with words such as "love," "peace" and "harmony," in several languages. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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South Korea Sends 1st Train In Plan To Reconnect With North

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South Korean Train Heads To The North For The First Time In More Than A Decade

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Ethnic Chinese students from the United States and Indonesia join local students for a martial arts class in Taishan, a city in China's Guangdong province. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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China Tries To Woo A Sprawling Global Chinese Diaspora

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Men walk past a TV screen showing a news program with an image of Japanese freelance journalist Jumpei Yasuda, on Wednesday. Yasuda, who disappeared three years ago in Syria, has been released and is now in Turkey, a Japanese official said. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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News Brief: Israel After Khashoggi's Killing, Trump Signs Opioid Bill

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Japanese Journalist Released After 3 Years' Captivity In Syria

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Why Secretary Of State Pompeo's Latest Trip To Asia Was Remarkable In 2 Ways

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Pompeo Describes Talks With North Korea's Leader As 'Productive'

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The front page of the Communist Party's flagship newspaper the People's Daily (center) and other papers are seen one day after the unveiling of the new Politburo Standing Committee in Beijing last year. Thomas Peter/Reuters hide caption

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Chinese Leaders Leverage Media To Shape How The World Perceives China

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