Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

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Landmark Court Ruling In Japan Holds Government Accountable For 2011 Nuclear Meltdown

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A man watches a news broadcast of a military parade commemorating the 75th anniversary of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party held in Pyongyang, at a railway station in Seoul. Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images

Indian Minister of External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar (from left), Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attend a meeting Tuesday in Tokyo. Charly Triballeau/Pool via AP hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/Pool via AP

Doctors Say South Korea Health Care System Is Facing A Major Crisis

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People pass a TV screen on Friday at the Seoul Railway Station. The Korean words on the screen say, "President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19." Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Lessons Learned After 1 Million Global Coronavirus Deaths

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People at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul watch a news program Friday showing a file image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who said he was sorry over the killing of a South Korean fisheries official near the two countries' disputed sea boundary. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Kim Jong Un Says He's Sorry That North Korean Troops Killed A South Korean Man

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Kim Jong Un Apologizes For Shooting Death Of South Korean Official

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A South Korean fisheries patrol boat seen off Yeonpyeong Island on Thursday, near North Korean waters. South Korean officials say a fisheries inspector working on the boat disappeared Monday and was killed by North Korean troops. Choi Jin-suk/Newsis via AP hide caption

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Choi Jin-suk/Newsis via AP

Yoshihide Suga receives applause Wednesday after being elected as Japan's new prime minister at Parliament's lower house in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

Yoshihide Suga Becomes Japan's Prime Minister, Pledging To Follow Abe's Course

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Japan's Parliament Picks Suga To Succeed Abe As Prime Minister

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Before Resigning, Prime Minister Makes A Final Push To Strengthen Japan's Military

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Members of conservative right-wing and Christian groups take part in an anti-government rally in Seoul on Aug. 15. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

The Volatile Mix Of A South Korean Church, Politics And The Coronavirus

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Fundamentalist Christian Church In South Korea At Odds With Government Over COVID-19

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How 3 Countries Are Educating Their Kids During The Pandemic

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