Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Stories By

Anthony Kuhn

Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

In this undated photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un makes a symbolic visit to Mt. Paektu in the country's north. Korean Central News Agency via NK News hide caption

toggle caption
Korean Central News Agency via NK News

Kim Jong Un Says North Korea No Longer Bound By Testing Moratorium

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/792805183/792821212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man watches TV news at a railroad station on Jan. 1 in Seoul, South Korea. While waiting for North Korea's leader to address his nuclear-weapons plans, the program featured file footage of a North Korean missile test. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images

Kim Jong Un Warns North Korea Will Introduce A New Strategic Weapon Soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/792736831/792736832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

North Korea To Open Tourist Resort, But Experts Think It Will Be A Waste Of Money

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/792456869/792456892" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why Japanese Fathers Don't Take Paternity Leave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/792146700/792146701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Korea was once the largest source of children for international adoptions. The U.S. became their main destination. Some Korean-born adoptees feel distant from both the country of their birth and the country where they were raised, but in recent years, many have gone back to build ties with their birth families. Grace Heejung Kim for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Grace Heejung Kim for NPR

'Feeling Like We Belong': U.S. Adoptees Return To South Korea To Trace Their Roots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775355015/791918174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some Adoptees Are Returning To South Korea To Trace Their Roots And Reconnect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791560801/791560802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: North Korea Threat, Notre Dame Closed For Christmas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791274070/791274071" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Downplays Threat Of 'Gift' From North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791274133/791274134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Japan's Cherry Blossom Party Grows Into A Political Scandal For Prime Minister

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784883421/784883466" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

North Korea To End Negotiations If U.S. Doesn't Offer Concessions By Year's End

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782130822/782130823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters in Seoul, South Korea, on Nov. 14 march ahead of a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

As Tensions Rise Over Defense Costs, U.S. Walks Out Of Talks With South Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780760208/780868030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Death Of K-Pop Singer Leads To Discussion About Online Bullying

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771095252/771095253" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Japan Begins Recovery Process After Deadly Typhoon Hits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/770005624/770005625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript