Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.

Models for children's wear wait for a show during China Fashion Week in Beijing on Thursday. China announced an end to the one-child policy for urban couples that had been place for more than three decades. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

As China Lifts One-Child Policy, Many Chinese Respond With Snark

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U.S. Navy Destroyer Sails Through Contested Waters In South China Sea

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What's The Strategy?: U.S. Considers Sending Ships To South China Sea

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A circus-themed streetcar approaches a pedestrian crosswalk in Guangzhou, China. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In D.C. And China, Two Approaches To A Streetcar Unconstrained By Wires

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"When I was in New York, I wanted to hang out with all these amazing musicians that I really admired," says nightclub D-22 owner Michael Pettis. "But I wasn't cool enough. So I figured, well, if I create a club and they all play there, then I get to hang out with them." Nelson Ching/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Ching/Bloomberg via Getty Images

As China Cracks Down On Cultural Fringe, Indie Rock Finds A Home In Beijing

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A baptism ceremony for a child on Ikitsuki Island, Nagasaki prefecture. After Japan's military ruler banned Christianity in the late 1500s, many Christians went underground, holding services such as these in their homes. Courtesy of Shimano-yakata Museum, Ikitsuki hide caption

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Courtesy of Shimano-yakata Museum, Ikitsuki

Driven Underground Years Ago, Japan's 'Hidden Christians' Maintain Faith

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Xi Jinping presided over a Beijing military parade marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. To some observers, this showed Xi in firm political and military control. On the economic side, though, the signals are more mixed. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Amid Tensions, China's President Heads To The U.S.

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Buddhist And Muslim Relations Underly Southeast Asia Refugee Crisis

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Musashi Fuchu Little League baseball players spend eight to 10 hours a day on weekends practicing on this field on the outskirts of Tokyo. This traditional powerhouse team has won the Little League World Series twice before, in 2013 and 2003, but did not qualify this season. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The Secret To Japan's Little League Success: 10-Hour Practices

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Japanese Prime Minister Expresses 'Profound Grief' For WWII Aggression

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Prime Minister Abe Wants Japan To Cast Off Post-War Guilt

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Japan Restarts Its First Nuclear Power Plant Since 2011 Disaster

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A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki more than a month after the nuclear attack in 1945. Stanley Troutman/AP hide caption

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Stanley Troutman/AP

Remembering The Horror Of Nagasaki 70 Years Later

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Hong Kong's Democracy Dilemma: Settle For Some, Or Keep Fighting?

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