Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
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Anthony Kuhn

Customers browse books on Chinese politics by Mighty Current, the publisher that has seen five of its booksellers disappear, at a stall set up by political activists in Hong Kong on Feb. 5. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

A Chilling Effect As Hong Kong's Missing Bookseller Cases Go Unresolved

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Students take part in a protest at the University of Hong Kong on Jan. 20. They protested after a pro-Beijing official was appointed to a senior role, amid growing worry over increasing political interference in academia. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

In Hong Kong, A Tussle Over Academic Freedom

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Allies Discuss How To Respond To North Korea's Rocket Launch

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Paul Tang, owner of the People's Bookstore in Hong Kong, is still selling works that are critical of the Chinese leadership and are banned on the mainland. Five people in the Hong Kong book industry disappeared recently. Some have turned up in police custody on the mainland. But Tang says he isn't particularly worried about his safety. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The Hong Kong Bookseller Who's Keeping 'Banned' Books On His Shelves

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Qiao Guohua patrols a 5-mile stretch of the Great Wall of China. Roughly a third of the wall's 12,000 miles have crumbled to dust, and saving what's left may be the world's greatest challenge in cultural preservation. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Great Wall Is Crumbling In Many Places; Can It Be Saved?

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Before Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party sealed the vote in the nation's presidential elections on Saturday night, K-pop singer Chou Tzu-yu was forced to apologize after waving the Taiwanese flag on a TV broadcast. A DPP supporter holds a sign showing Tzu-yu. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese Human Rights Lawyer Convicted; Receives Suspended Sentence

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China's Cyberspace Administration minister Lu Wei (second from right) and other officials attend the opening ceremony of the Light of the Internet Expo on Tuesday as part of the Second World Internet Conference, which starts Wednesday. Lu has said that controlling the Internet is about as easy as "nailing Jell-O to the wall." Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov

China's Internet Forum May Provide A Peek At Its Cyber-Ambitions

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Record Breaking Smog In China, India Underlines Climate Summit In Paris

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The Beijing Environment Exchange, one of seven emissions trading pilot programs in China, may be part of a nationwide carbon market by as early as 2017. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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China Plans To Create A Nationwide Carbon Market By 2017

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Supporters of Myanmar's National League for Democracy cheer as election results are posted outside party headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar's capital. Aung San Suu Kyi and other opposition leaders have tried to temper the celebrations, in anticipation of having to form a coalition — and contend with the military. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

Amid Slow Vote Count, Myanmar Opposition 'Cautiously' Eyes Victory

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Myanmar's Opposition Party Headed For Victory In Parliamentary Elections

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