Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
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Anthony Kuhn

Filipino children sit in front of their slum homes in Manila, Philippines. Activists are trying to organize slum dwellers in order to provide them with a political voice. Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images

Southeast Asian Slums Network For Housing Rights

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A screen grab taken from news footage by Japanese public broadcaster NHK shows an aerial view of damaged train carriages in Shinchi, Fukushima prefecture, on March 12. NHK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NHK/AFP/Getty Images

People place sheets on the ground Sunday, awaiting their companions under the cherry trees at Tokyo's Ueno Park. The announcement of Tokyo's cherry-blossom viewing season, normally highly anticipated, has been overshadowed this year by Japan's ongoing crisis. Itsuo Inouye/AP hide caption

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Itsuo Inouye/AP

Marine Lance Cpl. Gregory Pollina pulls a pallet of relief supplies to a waiting helicopter aboard the USS Essex, which is conducting operations in support of Operation Tomodachi. The Marines and Navy are flying the much needed aid to the tsunami-devastated northeast coast of Japan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Life's Milestones Bittersweet For Japan's Survivors

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Hisaho Koseki, 82, barely escaped the tsunami when a neighbor drove her to safety. Now she's at a local evacuation center in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture. Her son has offered to take her in, but she doesn't want to burden him. "I have chronic ailments, and I don't know how much longer I'll live. I don't want to die, but in this situation, perhaps it would be better if I did," she says. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Members of Japan Self-Defense Force pray for the body of a tsunami victim wrapped in a tarp in Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture. Shuji Kajiyama/AP hide caption

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Shuji Kajiyama/AP

Survivors overlook the earthquake and tsunami-hit area in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture, Japan, on Thursday. Shuji Kajiyama/AP hide caption

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Shuji Kajiyama/AP

Quake Response Will Affect Japan's Future Crises

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An employee counts bundles of Thai bahts at Krung Thai Bank in Bangkok in October. A tidal wave of money is pouring into Asia and driving up regional currencies. Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images

Asian Nations Try Not To Get Scorched By 'Hot Money'

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