Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
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Anthony Kuhn

An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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China's Fu Yuanhui (left) celebrates her bronze medal win in the women's 100-meter backstroke with Canada's Kylie Masse, Hungary's Katinka Hosszu and the U.S.'s Kathleen Baker. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China Celebrates Bronze-Winning Olympic Swimmer's Spirit

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Du Daozheng browses his copy of The Annals of the Chinese Nation, or Yanhuang Chunqiu, in July at his home in Beijing. The 93-year old publisher, a stalwart of the Communist Party's embattled liberal wing, announced publication of the magazine would end after government officials ordered a leadership reshuffle and seized its offices. Gerry Shih/AP hide caption

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Gerry Shih/AP

Amid Crackdown, China's Last Liberal Magazine Fights For Survival

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Students perform a creative writing exercise at Cold Water Well Middle School. Students write descriptive prose from the perspective of a human statue, a blind person feeling the statue, and an outside observer. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In China, Some Schools Are Playing With More Creativity, Less Cramming

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An Uber Station is shown outside a hotel in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. Uber spent $1 billion in China last year, but only got a share of around 10 percent, compared to Didi Chuxing's more than 80 percent. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In China, A Battle Uber Didn't Win

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The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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International Tribunal Rules Against China's Claims In The South China Sea

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International Tribunal Rejects China's Claim To South China Sea

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Small fishing boats sit in the dock in Tanmen on Hainan Island. The government has subsidized the upgrading of Tanmen's fishing fleet as part of its drive to exert more control in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In A Chinese Port Town, South China Sea Dispute Is Personal

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Historic Shifts In Public Opinion Made Election Firsts Possible In Taiwan

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Hong Kong Bookseller Describes Harrowing Ordeal With Chinese Police

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University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

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Chinese Billionaire Takes On Disney With His Own Theme Parks

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Taiwan Inaugurates First Female President

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