Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
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Anthony Kuhn

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, arrives for a welcome ceremony for Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon in Beijing on Thursday. State media announced a key Chinese Communist Party meeting held once every five years will start on Oct. 18. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Gen. Dunford Visits Asia Amid Heightened Tensions With North Korea

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Reactions Out Of China And Guam Over Exchanges Between U.S. And North Korea

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Chinese Blockbuster 'Wolf Warrior II' Mixes Jingoism With Hollywood Heroism

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Luo Changping, left, and Deng Fei. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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China's Few Investigative Journalists Face Increasing Challenges

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An armored Chinese police van is seen next to the Friendship Bridge on the Yalu River connecting the North Korean town of Sinuiju and the Chinese city of Dandong. China is North Korea's biggest trading partner. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Men look at computers in an Internet bar in Beijing in 2015. Even as the government finds new methods to block virtual private networks, providers find ways to go around the blocks. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Behind China's VPN Crackdown, A 'Game Of Cat And Mouse' Continues

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Morning News Brief: Trump In West Virginia, Chinese Trade, Usain Bolt Retires

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State Control Leaves Investigative Journalists In China Demoralized

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In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

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AP

Chinese Dissident And Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo Dies At 61

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A chair sat empty for Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo in Oslo, Norway, in 2010. The rights activist was imprisoned in China in 2009. Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters display portraits of jailed Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Liu has expressed the wish to leave China for medical treatment, but the government has refused. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

As China's Strength Has Grown, So Has Its Unwillingness To Let Dissidents Leave

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China Less Willing To Send Dissidents Abroad Than Before

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Qinhuangdao's elevated bus, seen last month in this photo, will not move forward. The municipal government denied it had endorsed the project, and last month began dismantling the test site. VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images

China's Elevated Bus Project Seemed Too Good To Be True — And It Was

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