Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.

Beijing-based restaurateur Song Ji (right) demonstrates his system, which allows customers to tip waitstaff. Diners use smartphones to scan QR codes that the waitstaff wear on their sleeves. This generates a tip of 4.56 yuan, or about 70 cents. Waitress Liu Enhui (left), the top tip-getter at the restaurant, says she can earn up to $30 a day in tips. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494865283/495595136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ethnic Yi schoolgirls take a break halfway down the mountain, on their way from their homes in Atule'er village to their first day of school in a new semester. The difficulty of getting up and down the mountain has made it hard for villagers to shake off poverty, and made it challenging for their children to attend school. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Harrowing, Mountain-Scaling Commute For Chinese Schoolkids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493916854/496525980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jeffrey Wood has been studying at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. He is now preparing for a career as a diplomat. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

For U.S. Minority Students In China, The Welcome Comes With Scrutiny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491476036/494360303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police Crush Uprising In Chinese Fishing Village Of Wukan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493881360/493881361" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Chinese flag flies on a boat next to the bridge that spans the Yalu River linking the North Korean town of Sinuiju with the Chinese town of Dandong. Most of North Korea's trade is with China, and much of it crosses the border here. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Yuan Shanshan holds her 5-month-old baby on the outskirts of Beijing. Her husband, human rights lawyer Xie Yanyi, was arrested last year on charges of inciting subversion, and she's waiting until he's released to name the child. Xie is expected to stand trial soon. He's among a large number of Chinese human rights lawyers who have been prosecuted in the past year. Anthony Kuhn / NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn / NPR

New Challenge For China's Human Rights Lawyers: Defending Themselves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492857839/492857840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

G-20 Summit Highlights Step Forward For U.S., China Relations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492727547/492727550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

G-20 Summit Wraps Up In Hangzhou, China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492674778/492674779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

China Shows G-20 World Leaders Its Temporarily Blue Skies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492629573/492629574" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AP

Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491452735/491452736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

China's Fu Yuanhui (left) celebrates her bronze medal win in the women's 100-meter backstroke with Canada's Kylie Masse, Hungary's Katinka Hosszu and the U.S.'s Kathleen Baker. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images

China Celebrates Bronze-Winning Olympic Swimmer's Spirit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490314055/490314056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Du Daozheng browses his copy of The Annals of the Chinese Nation, or Yanhuang Chunqiu, in July at his home in Beijing. The 93-year old publisher, a stalwart of the Communist Party's embattled liberal wing, announced publication of the magazine would end after government officials ordered a leadership reshuffle and seized its offices. Gerry Shih/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerry Shih/AP

Amid Crackdown, China's Last Liberal Magazine Fights For Survival

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489318226/489512825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students perform a creative writing exercise at Cold Water Well Middle School. Students write descriptive prose from the perspective of a human statue, a blind person feeling the statue, and an outside observer. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, Some Schools Are Playing With More Creativity, Less Cramming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488581846/489138662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Uber Station is shown outside a hotel in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. Uber spent $1 billion in China last year, but only got a share of around 10 percent, compared to Didi Chuxing's more than 80 percent. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Battle Uber Didn't Win

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488477289/488477290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images