Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

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Story Archive

Signs on a screen are shown before an athletics test event for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games last month at the National Stadium in Tokyo. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan Aims To Convince A Wary Public The Olympics Will Be Safe

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Despite COVID Criticisms, Olympic Organizers Say Tokyo Is A Well Prepared Host

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A Cambodian migrant farm worker stands outside the greenhouse where she works growing vegetables in Miryang, South Korea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

As Workforce Ages, South Korea Increasingly Depends On Migrant Labor

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As Most Of Japan Is Under Emergency Orders, Calls Grow To Cancel Olympics

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New Immigration Policy Could Be The Solution To South Korea's Population Decline

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People carry a banner reading "Extinguish the Olympic torch" during a march in Tokyo last week calling for the cancellation of the Summer Olympics. The government insists the games will go on despite concerns about the coronavirus. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

U.S. State Department Tells Travelers To Avoid All Trips To Japan

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People in Seoul watch a news report in November on the U.S. election, showing images of Joe Biden, newly elected as president, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images

At White House Summit, South Korea's Moon Will Make A Push For North Korea Peace

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Biden-Moon Summit Aims To Show U.S.-Korea Alliance Is Solid

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A demonstrator holds a placard during an anti-Olympics demonstration in Tokyo on Monday. A prominent doctors association has joined calls to cancel the Summer Games in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

A crowd demonstrates against the Tokyo Olympics earlier this month in Tokyo. With less than three months remaining until the Olympics, concern lingers in Japan over the feasibility of hosting such a huge event during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images

Opposition To Tokyo Games Grows Heated Amid COVID Concerns

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Months Before Japan's Olympic Games, More Pandemic Concerns Are Raised

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Shaman Jeong Soon-deok holds up a fan, bells and other ceremonial objects during an initiation ceremony at a temple in Seoul. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Shamanism Endures In Both Koreas — But In The North, Shamans Risk Arrest Or Worse

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The Philippines has begun administering its first batch of Russian Sputnik V vaccines to healthcare workers, elderly citizens, and persons with comorbidities. Manila and nearby provinces remain under strict lockdown as cases of the coronavirus continue to rise. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Low Global Vaccination Rate Sparks Fears Of COVID-19 Surges

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