Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

Story Archive

A news program at the Seoul Railway Station broadcasts a report on the resumption of communication between North and South Korea on Tuesday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

North And South Korea Restart Communication Channels After Near 14 Months Of Silence

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Japan's Position On Defending Taiwan Has Taken A Remarkable Shift

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Toyota, Panasonic and other big Japanese firms are distancing themselves from the Tokyo Olympics, despite spending millions to sponsor the Games. Here, guide lines are seen on the floor inside National Stadium, the main venue for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Noriko Hayashi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Noriko Hayashi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A medical staffer wearing protective gear gestures after collecting a swab from a visitor to test for the coronavirus at a temporary testing station in Seoul in December 2020. South Korea on Friday announced it would raise restrictions in the capital region to the highest level as a fourth wave of infections is gaining speed. Jung Yeon-Je /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je /AFP via Getty Images

A woman passes the Olympic Rings near the National Stadium last month in Tokyo. There won't be any spectators at Olympic events in Japan's capital. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

The Tokyo Olympics Will Take Place Under A State Of Emergency And Without Spectators

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Journalists look at cardboard beds for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic at the Village Plaza near Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Village Sunday, June 20, in Tokyo. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Even With Cardboard Beds And Recycled Medals, Olympics Take Flak Over The Environment

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A Fresh Wave Of Coronavirus Infections Loom Over The Olympics

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks Tuesday during a Politburo meeting of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang. Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP hide caption

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Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP

North Korea Says It Will Stop Trying To Overthrow South Korea. Why now?

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Domestic Fans May Attend Olympic Events, No Foreign Spectators

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Signs on a screen are shown before an athletics test event for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games last month at the National Stadium in Tokyo. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan Aims To Convince A Wary Public The Olympics Will Be Safe

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Despite COVID Criticisms, Olympic Organizers Say Tokyo Is A Well Prepared Host

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A Cambodian migrant farm worker stands outside the greenhouse where she works growing vegetables in Miryang, South Korea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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As Workforce Ages, South Korea Increasingly Depends On Migrant Labor

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