Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

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A woman named Un A leads viewers on a tour of the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, in a recent YouTube video. "Every building in Pyongyang is going through general cleaning to shake off winter dust," she says in English. Echo of Truth/YouTube hide caption

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Echo of Truth/YouTube

North Korea Makes A Push To Reach Foreign Audiences On YouTube And Twitter

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North Korea Steps Up Efforts To Reach Out To Foreign Audiences On Social Media

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Coronavirus Cases Across Asia Are Again On The Rise

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Kim Yo Jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, attends a wreath-laying ceremony at Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum in Hanoi, Vietnam, on March 2, 2019. Jorge Silva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jorge Silva/AFP via Getty Images

Kim Yo Jong, Sister Of North Korea's Ruler, Rises Through Ranks With Tough Rhetoric

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Seoul Debates How To View Mayor's Death As Sexual Harassment Allegations Emerge

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Police say that Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon, shown during a press conference earlier this month, was found dead in a wooded park. A police official says the cause of death is under investigation. Cheon Jin-hwan/Newsis via AP hide caption

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Cheon Jin-hwan/Newsis via AP

Workers wearing protective suits fumigate an art hall with antiseptic solution as a precaution against the spread of the Middle East respiratory syndrome in Seoul, South Korea, in June 2015. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

South Korea Holds Onto Patient Data From Prior Coronavirus, Worrying Privacy Groups

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Park describes his experiences as a child soldier during an interview in his office in Yeongju. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Thousands Of Child Soldiers Died In The Korean War. Survivors Want More Recognition

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Remembering A Little-Known Group Of Korean Fighters In 'The Forgotten War'

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South Korea Admits Keeping Personal Data Of 2015 MERS Outbreak Patients

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A man watches a television screen showing a news program with video of the demolition of the inter-Korean liaison office building in Kaesong, North Korea, at the Seoul Railway Station on Wednesday. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

An image from a thermal observation device shows the explosion of an inter-Korean liaison office building in North Korea's Kaesong as seen from Paju, South Korea, on Tuesday. South Korea Defense Ministry/Yonhap via AP hide caption

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South Korea Defense Ministry/Yonhap via AP

In 'Terrific Explosion,' North Korea Blows Up Liaison Office

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North Korea Destroys Liaison Office It Shared With South Korea

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North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with President Trump after taking part in a signing ceremony at the end of their historic U.S.-North Korea summit at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Recruits Asian Allies To Confront China

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