Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

Wang Zemin
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Seoul, South Korea, reporting on the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Before moving to Seoul in 2018, he traveled to the region to cover major stories including the North Korean nuclear crisis and the Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster.

Kuhn previously served two five-year stints in Beijing, China, for NPR, during which he covered major stories such as the Beijing Olympics, geopolitical jousting in the South China Sea, and the lives of Tibetans, Uighurs, and other minorities in China's borderlands.

He took a particular interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Prior to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American studies in Nanjing.

Story Archive

Thursday

Monday

U.S. defense secretary visits ally South Korea as it faces growing North Korea threat

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Thursday

Friday

President Biden will welcome Japan's prime minister at the White House

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Friday

American journalist Nate Thayer sits bandaged in a hotel room on Oct. 15, 1989, in Aranyaprathet, Thailand, after he was injured in a land mine explosion. Thayer survived several brushes with death over decades covering conflict in Southeast Asia and was the last Western journalist to interview Pol Pot. He was found dead at his home in Falmouth, Mass., on Tuesday. AP hide caption

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AP

Thursday

A lunch at Onigiri Bongo includes mustard green and salmon flake onigiri, miso soup, pickles and green tea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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People in Tokyo wait in line 3 hours for a taste of these Japanese rice balls

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Monday

How one Japanese restaurateur turned the humble rice ball into a must-eat dish

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Friday

Japan shifts away from its post-war defense policies

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Members of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force disembark from a V-22 Osprey aircraft during a live-fire exercise at East Fuji Maneuver Area in Gotemba, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan, on May 28. The annual live-fire drill took place as Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida pledged to boost defense spending after a summit with U.S. President Biden and other "Quad" leaders. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

In Japan, longtime restrictions are lifted to allow a major defense buildup

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Friday

South Korea's supreme court rules on legal transgender recognition

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Tuesday

What the recent missile launches from North Korea could mean

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Monday

As Biden and Xi meet in Bali, rest of Asia watches closely, too

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Friday

Among the flowers left at the alleyway where more than 150 people were killed in a crowd crush, a poster references the time — 6:34 p.m. — when police received the first call warning of the dangerous crowd size, about four hours before the crush turned deadly. Kang Jin-Kyu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kang Jin-Kyu/AFP via Getty Images