Lulu Garcia-Navarro Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.

Lulu Garcia-Navarro 2017 square Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Voss/NPR

Lulu Garcia-Navarro 2017 square

Stephen Voss/NPR

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Host, Weekend Edition Sunday

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday. She is infamous in the IT department of NPR for losing laptops to bullets, hurricanes, and bomb blasts.

Before joining the Sunday morning team, she served an NPR correspondent based in Brazil, Israel, Mexico, and Iraq. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage, and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement. She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton. She has also won awards for her work on migration in Mexico and the Amazon in Brazil.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-September 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. She was posted for the AP to Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion, where she stayed covering the conflict.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

Highlights from Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

A Samba School Shout Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/584896259/584896260" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

TOTO's 40 Trips Around The Sun is due out Feb. 9. Scott Richie/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Richie/Courtesy of the artist

TOTO Celebrates '40 Trips Around The Sun' With New Album

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582121518/584896278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Heart Berries,' by Terese Marie Mailhot Counterpoint hide caption

toggle caption
Counterpoint

In 'Heart Berries,' An Indigenous Woman's Chaotic Coming-Of-Age

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/584643934/584896290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In one of the most reproduced images of all time, the crew of Apollo 17 captured the perspective of Earth known as "Blue Marble." NASA/Newsmakers/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Newsmakers/Getty Images

The First Men To Have The Whole World In Their Sights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582534895/583095487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Linda Walker at her home in Morganton, NC. Walker, who was struck by lightning as a child while at camp, has reconnected with the friend who saved her. Travis Dove/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Dove/NPR

50 Years After She Was Struck By Lightning, Reconnecting With The Girl Who Saved Her

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582904413/583095493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox spoke with NPR about his book, Let's Move On: Beyond Fear & False Prophets. The book highlights the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former Mexican President To Trump: 'If You Want To Build A Wall, Waste Your Money'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/581397075/581397076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Claire Harbage/NPR

A Plucky English Heroine Amid New York's Super-Rich In 'Still Me'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/581092880/581397140" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dutch Railways began "Heartbeats," a program to connect strangers who had met on trains, in the 1990s. It started with messages printed out on free train magazines before the railway moved Heartbeats online in 2008. Evert Elzinga/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Evert Elzinga/AFP/Getty Images

Reconnecting Strangers On A Train, One Tumblr Post At A Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/581287893/581397125" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kyle Stephens was the first person to testify last week during Larry Nassar's sentencing hearing in Michigan. The former USA Gymnastics team doctor has admitted to having sexual contact with minors. Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images

Nassar Testimony Brings One Sexual Abuse Survivor Sadness - And Then Some Relief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/579500367/579500368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Illustration and Painting erhui1979/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
erhui1979/Getty Images

A Tenn. Man Recently Discovered The Largest Prime Number Known To Humankind

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576301169/576301170" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Highline writer Michael Hobbes says millennials have inherited a number of financial problems from baby boomers. monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images/iStockphoto

'Entitled' Millennials Have It Harder Than The Previous Generation, Writer Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576301190/576301191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Greta Pane is a post-doctoral fellow in English literature at Boston University. Sally Pane hide caption

toggle caption
Sally Pane

Meeting After A Moment Of Musical Connection, 17 Years Later

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576301204/576301205" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The High Museum of Art in Atlanta has worked to make diversity a priority. In recent years, the museum has seen an increase in the percentage of nonwhite visitors. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Bazemore/AP

How An Art Museum Is Reaching A More Diverse Audience

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576219631/576301287" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571443683/571443684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genesis Blu calls herself a "raptivist" — a mix of rapper and activist. Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist

A Conversation With Houston's 'Raptivist' Genesis Blu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569477801/569716848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript