Lulu Garcia-Navarro Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.
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Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Brazilian Politician's Fiery Comments Revives Debate On Free Speech

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Cubans Curious To See If Diplomatic Shift Leads To Democracy

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A man gets information about how to buy dollars at a foreign exchange business in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Jan. 27. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Argentina's Approach To Inflation: Ditch The Peso, Hoard U.S. Dollars

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Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period. Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov

Brazil's Tearful President Praises Report On Abuses Of A Dictatorship

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A newsstand owner counts Argentine pesos in Buenos Aires. Many Argentines carry large amounts of cash, saying they do not trust banks. This has contributed to a surge in robberies. Leo La Valle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leo La Valle/AFP/Getty Images

Argentina: Where Cash Is King And Robberies Are On The Rise

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A wall in Buenos Aires, Argentina, displays posters with an image of U.S. Judge Thomas Griesa and a message in Spanish — "Sovereignty or vulture scam" — in support of Argentina's government in its dispute against a U.S. hedge fund, known locally as a "vulture fund." Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

The Man Argentines Love To Hate Is An American Judge

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Outgoing Uruguay President Jose Mujica's face illustrates a T-shirt supporting his new law legalizing marijuana. Uruguay's citizens are voting for Mujica's replacement on Sunday, and the expected winner is a candidate from his party. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

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Matilde Campodonico/AP

Uruguay Tries To Tame A 'Monster' Called Cannabis

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Argentines March On Presidential Palace To Protest Inflation

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Corruption Scandal Engulfs Brazil's State Oil Company

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Chefs Meet In Brazil To Discuss Food Biodiversity

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Brazilian fruits, including jambu and tapereba (lower right), displayed for a gathering of chefs in Sao Paolo. Paula Moura for NPR hide caption

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Paula Moura for NPR

Ferran Adria And Fellow Star Chefs Talk Biodiversity In Brazil

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Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

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Brazil's judicial system faces a massive backlog of cases — and stacks of paperwork. One group of five judges in Sao Paulo is currently handling 1.6 million cases. G Dettmar/National Council of Justice hide caption

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G Dettmar/National Council of Justice

Brazil: The Land Of Many Lawyers And Very Slow Justice

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After Shocking Election Season In Brazil, Incumbent President Still Holds Power

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