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The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever. Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images hide caption

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Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images

Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

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World Cup Fans Preoccupied With Soccer's Version Of Baseball Cards

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As World Cup Looms, Brazilian Cities Paralyzed By Protests

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Brazilian kids play soccer in a favela, or shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. Brazil is hosting the World Cup next month and its team is considered the favorite. Many of the country's top players learned the game playing in the street or on dirt fields. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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For Brazil's Soccer Stars, Careers Often Begin On Makeshift Fields

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Brazilians Use Lead Up To World Cup To Protest Grievances

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Uruguay's President Jose Mujica, who is known for his modest lifestyle, sits outside his home on the outskirts of Montevideo earlier this month. Under his leadership, Uruguay legalized marijuana, from the growing to the selling. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

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Matilde Campodonico/AP

Meet Uruguay's Pot-Legalizing, VW-Driving, Sandal-Wearing President

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A Postcard From Rio, Where World Cup Readiness Remains Uncertain

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Bringing Poetry And High Culture To Sao Paulo's Periphery

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Brazil Has A Lot Riding On Its World Cup Team's Outcome

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Emicida. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Emicida: 'People Sample What Is Nearest To Them'

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Demonstrators rally to protest sexism in Brasilia, Brazil, last June. A new protest erupted last week after a study released by Brazil's Institute for Applied Economic Research reported 65 percent of Brazilians believe women who dress provocatively deserve to be attacked. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Venezuelans line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas on March 10. Protesters have been taking to the streets for weeks over the country's troubled economy and other issues. The government introduced a new foreign currency exchange system on Monday, seeking to stabilize the bolivar, which has lost much of its value against the U.S. dollar. Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Short On Dollars, Venezuela Tries To Halt Black-Market Trading

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Opposition Fails To Maintain Momentum In Venezuela

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People line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas, Venezuela. LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Venezuela In Turmoil For Lack Of Flour, Milk And Diapers

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