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People line up outside the Venezuelan National Electoral Council in Caracas, the capital, on Monday. They were confirming their signatures supporting a recall referendum against President Nicolas Maduro. The country is suffering skyrocketing inflation and chronic shortages of basic goods. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Brazil's Olympic Torch Relay Goes Well Until Jaguar Is Shot And Killed

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Troubles Besetting Olympics Are A Window Into Long-term Crises Facing Brazil

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Cleaners in Rio de Janeiro collect debris from Guanabara Bay that washed up onto the beach last December. The bay, which will host sailing events at the Olympics in August, is heavily polluted. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Olympic Sailors And Fishermen Alike, Rio's Dirty Bay Sets Off Alarms

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People walk past graffiti art in the Providencia community of Rio, a favela that dates back to 1897. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Is The Risk Of Catching Zika Greater In Poor Neighborhoods?

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IOC President Tours Rio Venues, Confident Olympics Will Be Great

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Yolande Mabika, a refugee and judo athlete from the Democratic Republic of Congo, stands outside her newly rented apartment in Rio de Janeiro. Mabika and fellow Congolese athlete Popole Misenga came to Brazil in 2013 to compete in a judo championship; they became refugees after their coach vanished with their passports and money. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

For The First Time, A Team Of Refugees Will Compete At The Olympics

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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Reports Of Brutal Rape In India, Brazil Ignite National Debate

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Key Minister In Brazil's New Government Steps Down After Tape Is Leaked

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Brazil's New All-Male Interim Government Marks Conservative Shift

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Brazil's new finance minister Henrique Meirelles (left) and acting President Michel Temer gesture during the Cabinet inauguration ceremony in Brazil's capital Brasilia, on Thursday. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was suspended earlier to face an impeachment trial. Andressa Anholete/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Senate Suspends President Rouseff From Office

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