Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR.
Alina Selyukh 2016
Stories By

Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she covers retail, low-wage work, big brands and other aspects of the consumer economy. Her work has been recognized by the Gracie Awards, the National Headliner Award and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Previously, Selyukh reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, she helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station. Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local TV station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Story Archive

Monday

Red Lobster files for bankruptcy after missteps, including all-you-can-eat shrimp

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1252426352/1252540865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This Red Lobster in Maryland was among dozens of locations that closed abruptly ahead of the restaurant's bankruptcy filing. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alina Selyukh/NPR

Red Lobster files for bankruptcy after missteps including all-you-can-eat shrimp

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1252426585/1252553029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Monday

More hotels are catering to the 'bleisure' — business and leisure — traveler

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1251100486/1251131625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vinay Patel, head of Fairbrook Hotels, owns 11 hotels around Virginia. Amar Patel/Courtesy of Vinay Patel hide caption

toggle caption
Amar Patel/Courtesy of Vinay Patel

With 'bleisure' and fewer workers, the American hotel is in recovery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1250205737/1250855247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

People say they worry about inflation. Their restaurant spending might show otherwise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1249231490/1249231491" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Thursday

Monday

Friday

Broadband firms must publish all the fees and specifics of their internet plans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244265677/1244265678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The first Amazon Fresh grocery store in London opened in 2021. The company is replacing its "Just Walk Out" technology at U.S. stores with smart shopping carts, but leaving it in the U.K. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leon Neal/Getty Images

Monday

Fast-food workers rally for health and safety protections near a McDonald's in Los Angeles, in 2021. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Half a million California workers will get $20 minimum wage, starting today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241743207/1241966585" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

Saturday

A McDonald's worker hands food to a customer at a drive-thru window in Los Angeles, on Sept. 28. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Damian Dovarganes/AP

California fast-food workers will get $20 minimum wage, starting Monday

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241451631/1241959495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Friday

Monday

Some big retailers reverse course and scale back their use of self-checkout

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239107299/1239107300" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Medications are locked in a glass cabinet at a supermarket. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bebeto Matthews/AP

Retailers howled about theft last year. Why not now?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1236075589/1241116189" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Friday

Tuesday

Monday

U.S. sues to block grocery megamerger of Kroger and Albertsons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1234005079/1234005080" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kroger first announced its plans to buy Albertsons in October 2022. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

FTC and 9 states sue to block Kroger-Albertsons supermarket merger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1232948796/1234114417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Checking in on the economy ahead of election season

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233702523/1233702524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Alexei Navalny is seen in 2012 behind the bars in a police van after he was detained during protests in Moscow a day after Vladimir Putin's inauguration. Sergey Ponomarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sergey Ponomarev/AP

Alexei Navalny, Russian politician who opposed Putin to the end, has died in prison

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231946376/1232139196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript