Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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All In On Malls

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A man works at a conveyor belt at an Amazon warehouse in New York City in 2019. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

California Bill Passes, Giving Amazon Warehouse Workers Power To Fight Speed Quotas

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California Bill Targets Fast-Paced Working Conditions At Warehouses

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New Stores Are Still Opening Despite The Pandemic

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People shop at a Macy's in New York this month. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

More Retail Workers Are Quitting Than Ever, But More Stores Are Opening Than Expected

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Retail Workers Are Quitting At A Record Pace. But Stores Are Rapidly Hiring, Too

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Signs reading "vote" hang outside the Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Ala., in March as workers wrapped up their seven-week mail-in election on whether to unionize. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

Amazon Warehouse Workers In Alabama May Get To Vote Again On Union

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Employees elbow bump at a JLL office in Menlo Park, Calif., in September. With the delta variant surging, mask mandates are returning, and some employers are now requiring employees to be vaccinated before coming to the office. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Back To The Office? Not Yet. Companies Scramble To Adjust To The Delta Variant

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Some families already got a head start on shopping for the school year when Amazon, Walmart, Target and others held huge summer sales. Now, parents are getting a new financial boost from the government: an increased child tax credit of up to $3,000 for school-age children. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Families Splurge On Clothes And Electronics In Likely Record Back-To-School Spree

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Lamar Cornett has worked in restaurants for more than 20 years. During the pandemic, he began thinking about leaving that career behind. Courtesy of Lamar Cornett hide caption

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Courtesy of Lamar Cornett

Low Pay, No Benefits, Rude Customers: Restaurant Workers Quit At Record Rate

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The Defense Department is canceling its mammoth cloud contract won by Microsoft and long litigated by Amazon. Richard Drew, Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew, Ted S. Warren/AP