Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business reporter at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Alina Selyukh 2016 Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Alina Selyukh

Reporter

Alina Selyukh is a business reporter at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Story Archive

Aleksandr Purgayev (left) and Aleksandr Selyukh grew up together, and both played for their town's soccer team in the 1970s. Purgayev is now the team's coach. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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Reporter's Notebook: In Small-Town Russia, 'Football Is My Life'

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While Reporting At The World Cup, Female Journalists Are Sexually Harassed

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Russia's World Cup Performance Is Surprising Fans And Critics

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In the Sochi Olympic Park, the Bolshoy Ice Dome is seen behind the Olympic flame cauldron, which now has a singing fountain that performs for tourists after sunset. The 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, was the most expensive Olympics in history. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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#Sochifornia: Locals Say 2014 Olympics Helped Sochi Shed Its Soviet Sheen

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For Russia, Hosting World Cup Is A Bid To Win Global Respect

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In a new NPR/Marist poll, 91 percent of American online shoppers said they "never" or "only rarely" return things they buy online. Frank Ramspott/Getty Images hide caption

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Online Shoppers Say They Rarely Return Purchases. Why?

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Close to two-thirds of Americans say they've bought something on Amazon, according to a new NPR/Marist poll. That's more than 90 percent of America's online shoppers. James Yang for NPR hide caption

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What Americans Told Us About Online Shopping Says A Lot About Amazon

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News Brief: North Korea Summit In Doubt, Primary Results, Net Neutrality

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Washington, D.C., is competing against its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland for Amazon's second headquarters. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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D.C. Un-United: Amazon's Second HQ Pits City Vs. Its Suburbs

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Lawmakers Ask Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Tougher Questions As Testimony Continues

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Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Is Back On Capitol Hill For A 2nd Day

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