Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016 Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Amazon Will Close Over 80 Small Kiosk Pop-Up Stores

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House labor committee Chairman Bobby Scott, D-Va., has shepherded through his committee a bill that would gradually raise the federal minimum wage to $15 from $7.25 by 2024. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In a memo to store managers, Walmart U.S. CEO Greg Foran said the company is looking for other roles for greeters with disabilities who are due to lose their jobs. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Support Pours In For Walmart Workers With Disabilities After Company Announcement

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John Combs is a "people greeter" at a Walmart in Vancouver, Wash. But he has been told that come April 25, his job is going away. And he is not alone. Courtesy of Rachel Wasser hide caption

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Courtesy of Rachel Wasser

Walmart Is Eliminating Greeters. Workers With Disabilities Feel Targeted

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Kraft Heinz Shares Down After Disappointing Fourth Quarter Results

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News Brief: Trump To Declare National Emergency For Border Wall

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Why Amazon Canceled Its NYC Plans

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A man runs along the waterfront in the Long Island City neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City, which had been the planned location for a secondary Amazon headquarters. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Amazon Drops Plans For New York Headquarters

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After his company's response to the Parkland shooting, Dick's Sporting Goods CEO Ed Stack became an unlikely corporate face of gun control. Scott Dalton/Invision for DICK'S Sporting Goods/AP Images hide caption

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Scott Dalton/Invision for DICK'S Sporting Goods/AP Images

Soul-Searching After Parkland, Dick's CEO Embraces Tougher Stance On Guns

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The Big Bezos Question: Will Investigators Take A New Look At American Media?

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Gillette Launches #MeToo-Inspired Ad Campaign, Backlash Follows

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The world of mainstream consumer brands is in a major slow-motion transformation. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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From Campbell's To Kellogg's, Classic Brands Are Feeling The Crunch

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