Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says that has trapped workers in "exploitative and discriminatory" job programs. erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

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erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images

Workers With Disabilities Can Earn Just $3.34 An Hour. Agency Says Law Needs Change

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People walk through the newly reopened mall at Hudson Yards in New York. U.S. shoppers spent more prudently in August and retail sales grew a tepid 0.6% from July. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Mall Company Simon Property Group Saves Another Retailer From Bankruptcy

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McDonald's is facing a lawsuit from 52 former franchisees accusing the fast-food giant of racial discrimination. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

52 Black Former Franchisees Sue McDonald's Alleging Discrimination

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A man walks past a Walmart store in Washington, D.C. on July 15. Walmart said it was "confident" that its joint deal with Microsoft would satisfy both TikTok users and U.S. government regulators. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

A shopper walks past shelves of school supplies at a Target store in San Rafael, Calif. Preparing for both in-person and virtual learning has families budgeting for new school supplies and bigger purchases. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Confusing Back-To-School Season May Lead To Blockbuster Spending

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People stand in the lobby of Amazon offices in New York in January 2019. At a time of mass work from home and many moving to spacious suburbs, Amazon is funding a large expansion of corporate real estate and jobs in New York and five other U.S. cities. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The house dress is having a 2020 renaissance. "I think #stayathome made people realize that we need to not just dress to go outside — we need to dress to be inside, love what we wear and feel comfortable," designer Malgosia Archer says. Żaneta Mieszczak/Malgosia Archer hide caption

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Żaneta Mieszczak/Malgosia Archer

Don't Sweat(pants) It. The House Dress Is Here To Rescue 2020

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McDonald's is suing former CEO Steve Easterbrook to claw back his exit payout, citing new evidence of inappropriate relationships with employees. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

'Silence And Lies': McDonald's Sues Fired CEO, Says He Hid Sexual Relationships

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Suits Out, Stretchy Pants In: More Retailers Go Bankrupt

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An employee works inside a Jos. A. Bank retail store in San Francisco. The parent company Tailored Brands earlier said it would close up to 500 stores and cut 20% of corporate jobs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman walks out of Lord & Taylor's flagship store in Manhattan in June 2018, before the location was closed and the building was sold in 2019. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images