Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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A McDonald's employee holds a sign during a 2018 protest against sexual harassment in the workplace in Chicago. Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images

McDonald's Is Sued Over 'Systemic Sexual Harassment' Of Female Workers

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Amazon Expected To Fight Pentagon's Decision On Microsoft For $10 Billion Contract

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Stephen Easterbrook was fired as CEO of McDonald's after his relationship with an employee was found to violate company policy. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

McDonald's Fired CEO Is Getting Millions, Putting Spotlight On Pay Gap

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Visits To The U.S. By Chinese Tourists Are Declining

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Goldfish, like these showcased at Tokyo's Nihonbashi Art Aquarium, have been bred in China over centuries, into forms so varied and rare that one can be worth hundreds of dollars. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War

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Forever 21 Files For Bankruptcy, May Close Up To 178 U.S. Stores

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Citing "growing federal, state and local regulatory complexity and uncertainty regarding e-cigarettes," Walmart says it will stop selling electronic cigarettes. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the company's climate initiative Thursday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon

Amazon Makes 'Climate Pledge' As Workers Plan Walkout

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Daniel Wood/NPR

NPR Shopping Cart Economics: How Prices Changed At A Walmart In 1 Year

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A Walmart logo forms part of a sign outside a Walmart store, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, in Walpole, Mass. Walmart is going back to its folksy hunting heritage and getting rid of anything that's not related to a hunting rifle after a mass shooting this summer. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Walmart Curbs Ammunition Sales, Calls For Stronger Background Checks

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Lord & Taylor Sold To Online Clothing Rental Startup For $100 Million

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Used Clothing Offers Fresh Hope For 2 Struggling Department Stores

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Frog meat is among the many items imported from China that had been facing tariffs in a few weeks, but now the tariffs are delayed until December. Emmanuelle Bonzami/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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