Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Story Archive

A postal worker carries packages through the snow on Jan. 3 in Washington, D.C. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

From living rooms to landfills, some holiday shopping returns take a 'very sad path'

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2021's holiday shopping season is on track to set a record

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Shoppers know more about how goods get to their door after 2021's supply-chain issues

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A delivery person rides a bicycle past a storefront in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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You might still have time to buy holiday gifts online and get same-day delivery

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Stores are using delivery apps like Uber to ensure same-day delivery

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Starbucks workers at three stores around Buffalo, N.Y., have voted on whether to join a union. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Starbucks workers form their 1st union in the U.S. in a big win for labor

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Tally pending on whether Buffalo-area Starbucks workers voted to unionize

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Starbucks workers and organizers in Buffalo, N.Y., discuss efforts to unionize three local stores on Oct. 28. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

Starbucks workers decide whether to form first U.S. union

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Alabama Amazon warehouse gets another chance to vote on unionizing

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People walk by a hiring sign in a store window in New York on Nov. 17. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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How understaffed are stores? Smaller retailers feel the holiday-shopping strain

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Black Friday is expected to deliver record-setting sales despite supply chain issues

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