Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Story Archive

To 'Free Chol Soo Lee,' Asian Americans had to find their collective political voice

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Pro-climber Tommy Caldwell details climate change's impact on rock climbing

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Girls and women in Afghanistan have been blocked from receiving an education

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We lost 1.59 milliseconds June 29 when the Earth spun a little faster

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Social media is deciding trends at breakneck pace, and it's fueling fast fashion

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Amazon may own your doctor's office next

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Encore: Binders, backpacks and inflation are on 2022's back-to-school shopping list

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People shop for school supplies at a Target store in Miami, Fla., on July 27. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

Binders, backpacks... and inflation are on this year's back-to-school shopping list

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An air fryer awaits its buyer at a Kroger store in Kentucky in 2020, when the kitchen appliance became a hot seller. Scotty Perry/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scotty Perry/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What happens when people want all the air fryers and then, suddenly, they don't

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Singer-songwriter Manizha, photographed at Eurovision in Rotterdam on May 16, 2021. She faced a cyberbullying campaign in Russia after voicing opposition to the country's military operation in Ukraine. Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

A new reality reverberates through Russia's music scene

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A cook prepares borsch at a March 2021 event in Kyiv to promote Ukraine's bid for UNESCO to recognize the dish as part of the country's historical heritage. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images