Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Casper changed mattress shopping with the promise of a 100-night "risk-free" trial and easy returns. Now the cost of those returns is being scrutinized as the online company prepares to go public. Yana Paskova/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Cost Of Free: Casper Pays A Price For Generous Mattress Returns

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New Federal Overtime Rule Takes Effect Jan. 1

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The Ultimate Procrastinator's Guide To Gifts

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Shopping For Sustainability

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A surprising number of cultural themes brought the scrunchie its new mass appeal — boosted by an Internet teen subculture. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Scrunchies Are Cool Again. Hair's How They Staged A Comeback

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McDonald's workers and supporters rally in Chicago in 2015 in what organizers at the time called the biggest-ever mobilization of U.S. workers. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Get It Low? 'Frozen 2' Merch Was Among Hot Products As Black Friday Tradition Cools

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People walk by a Black Friday promotional at Cookie's department store Friday in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Doorbusters Busted: Shoppers Rethink Black Friday

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Grocery Delivery Services May Rescue Thanksgiving Dinner

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Teri Smith is one of over 130,000 workers who shop for and deliver groceries for Instacart. Smith, 46, has worked for Instacart in Arlington, Texas, since August 2018. Allison V. Smith for NPR hide caption

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Allison V. Smith for NPR

At The Mercy Of An App: Workers Feel The Instacart Squeeze

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A lawsuit by 17 McDonald's workers accuses the fast-food chain of "undermining safety" with late-night work, store design changes and inadequate training. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

President Trump met with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos as part of the American Technology Council in June 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A McDonald's employee holds a sign during a 2018 protest against sexual harassment in the workplace in Chicago. Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images

McDonald's Is Sued Over 'Systemic Sexual Harassment' Of Female Workers

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