Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Suits Out, Stretchy Pants In: More Retailers Go Bankrupt

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An employee works inside a Jos. A. Bank retail store in San Francisco. The parent company Tailored Brands earlier said it would close up to 500 stores and cut 20% of corporate jobs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A woman walks out of Lord & Taylor's flagship store in Manhattan in June 2018, before the location was closed and the building was sold in 2019. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

An Amazon delivery truck is parked outside a warehouse in France on April 16. The online retail giant's revenues and profits soared in the second quarter. Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

4 Big Tech CEOs Testified Before House Panel's Anti-Trust Hearing

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies Wednesday via video before the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee. The hearing also featured the heads of Apple, Facebook and Google. Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Heads Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google Testify On Big Tech's Power

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CEOs Of 4 Tech Giants To Testify Before House Panel Hearing

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Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos in 1997 (left) and in 2017. He will appear before Congress for the first time this week a much-transformed leader of a much-transformed company. Paul Souders and Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Souders and Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Bigger And Brawnier: Clout Of Amazon And CEO Jeff Bezos Under Scrutiny

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Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP

Big Tech In Washington's Hot Seat: What You Need To Know

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An Ann Taylor store in New York City in 2015. Ascena Retail Group, which owns Ann Taylor, Loft and Lane Bryant, has filed for bankruptcy. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

As coronavirus cases persist and some states even backtrack their reopening plans, essential workers have flooded social media with calls for hazard pay. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

When Essential Workers Earn Less Than The Jobless: 'We Put The Country On Our Back'

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