Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.
Alina Selyukh 2016
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Alina Selyukh

Alina Selyukh 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Correspondent

Alina Selyukh is a business correspondent at NPR, where she follows the path of the retail and tech industries, tracking how America's biggest companies are influencing the way we spend our time, money, and energy.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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As coronavirus cases persist and some states even backtrack their reopening plans, essential workers have flooded social media with calls for hazard pay. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

When Essential Workers Earn Less Than The Jobless: 'We Put The Country On Our Back'

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A Target worker corrals shopping carts in Omaha, Neb., on June 16. The company is making permanent a $2 bonus it created during the pandemic, as many retailers have been phasing out "hazard pay." Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

"We recognize Aunt Jemima's origins are based on a racial stereotype," parent company Quaker Foods says, announcing plans to change the brand's logo and name. Donald King/AP hide caption

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Donald King/AP

Social distancing instructions are posted at California's Westfield Santa Anita shopping mall on June 12, as local businesses enter Phase 3 reopening. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Retail Sales Bounce Up 17.7% After Record Drop As States Reopen

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Amid Pandemic And Protests, American Businesses Grapple With The Future

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Like many people whose jobs involve personal interaction, Nicole Burke Stephenson had to get creative to keep making money while social distancing. Nicole Burke Stephenson hide caption

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Nicole Burke Stephenson

This weekend, temporary pay bumps for workers during the coronavirus pandemic are ending at companies across the country. In a normal world, high hazard pay might be the only way to stop employees from quitting en masse. But with tens of millions unemployed, workers quickly lost a lot of leverage. Ada Yokota/Getty Images hide caption

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Ada Yokota/Getty Images

As 'Hero' Pay Ends, Essential Workers Wonder What They Are Worth

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Who Is Responsible For The Safety Of Workers And Customers Upon Reopening, Continued

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Who Is Responsible For The Safety Of Workers And Customers Upon Reopening

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Frontline Workers Are Losing Temporary Wage Bumps Despite Increasing Risks

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Amid Pandemic, Business Owners Find Unique Ways To Stay Afloat

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A man walks past mannequins in the windows of a Macy's store in Boston on April 15. The company said its online sales started growing in April, but they "only partially offset" the losses from its stores. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP