Sarah McCammon Sarah McCammon is a National Desk correspondent with NPR News.
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Sarah McCammon

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Sarah McCammon 2018
Kara Frame/NPR

Sarah McCammon

Correspondent, National Desk

Sarah McCammon is a National Correspondent covering the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast for NPR. Her work focuses on political, social and cultural divides in America, including abortion and reproductive rights, and the intersections of politics and religion. She's also a frequent guest host for NPR news magazines, podcasts and special coverage.

During the 2016 election cycle, she was NPR's lead political reporter assigned to the Donald Trump campaign. In that capacity, she was a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast and reported on the GOP primary, the rise of the Trump movement, divisions within the Republican Party over the future of the GOP and the role of religion in those debates.

Prior to joining NPR in 2015, McCammon reported for NPR Member stations in Georgia, Iowa and Nebraska, where she often hosted news magazines and talk shows. She's covered debates over oil pipelines in the Southeast and Midwest, agriculture in Nebraska, the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Iowa and coastal environmental issues in Georgia.

McCammon began her journalism career as a newspaper reporter. She traces her interest in news back to childhood, when she would watch Sunday-morning political shows – recorded on the VCR during church – with her father on Sunday afternoons. In 1998, she spent a semester serving as a U.S. Senate Page.

She's been honored with numerous regional and national journalism awards, including the Atlanta Press Club's "Excellence in Broadcast Radio Reporting" award in 2015. She was part of a team of NPR journalists that received a first-place National Press Club award in 2019 for their coverage of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack.

McCammon is a native of Kansas City, Mo. She spent a semester studying at Oxford University in the U.K. while completing her undergraduate degree at Trinity College near Chicago.

Story Archive

With Roe v. Wade overturned, doctors expect to see more self-induced abortions

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How to stay safe and cool in extreme heat

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Kathaleen Pittman, administrator at Hope Medical Group in Shreveport, watches local TV news discussing a temporary restraining order the clinic won on Monday against Louisiana's abortion bans. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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After a reprieve, a Louisiana clinic resumes abortions for anxious patients

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After state court victories, clinics have resumed abortions in some states with bans

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Abortion providers in some states win reprieves in state courts

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The Supreme Court's abortion decision creates battlegrounds between states

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President Biden addresses the nation Friday following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

'Trigger laws' have been taking effect now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned

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Anit-abortion activists hold signs outside the US Supreme Court after overturning of Roe Vs. Wade, in Washington, DC, on June 24, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-abortion activists rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, ending right to abortion upheld for decades

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The White House is preparing for the end of Roe v. Wade

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New data from the Guttmacher Institute shows the number of U.S. abortions rose in 2020, reversing a decades-long trend toward declining numbers. Pictured here is a Planned Parenthood center in 2018 in Chicago, Illinois — a state whose increase in abortion was partly due to patients crossing the border from Missouri, which has more abortion restrictions. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-abortion rights groups say they don't support criminalizing abortion patients

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