Sarah McCammon Sarah McCammon is a National Desk correspondent with NPR News.
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Sarah McCammon

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Sarah McCammon 2018
Kara Frame/NPR

Sarah McCammon

Correspondent, National Desk

Sarah McCammon is a National Correspondent covering the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast for NPR. Her work focuses on political, social and cultural divides in America, including abortion and reproductive rights, and the intersections of politics and religion. She's also a frequent guest host for NPR news magazines, podcasts and special coverage.

During the 2016 election cycle, she was NPR's lead political reporter assigned to the Donald Trump campaign. In that capacity, she was a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast and reported on the GOP primary, the rise of the Trump movement, divisions within the Republican Party over the future of the GOP and the role of religion in those debates.

Prior to joining NPR in 2015, McCammon reported for NPR Member stations in Georgia, Iowa and Nebraska, where she often hosted news magazines and talk shows. She's covered debates over oil pipelines in the Southeast and Midwest, agriculture in Nebraska, the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Iowa and coastal environmental issues in Georgia.

McCammon began her journalism career as a newspaper reporter. She traces her interest in news back to childhood, when she would watch Sunday-morning political shows – recorded on the VCR during church – with her father on Sunday afternoons. In 1998, she spent a semester serving as a U.S. Senate Page.

She's been honored with numerous regional and national journalism awards, including the Atlanta Press Club's "Excellence in Broadcast Radio Reporting" award in 2015. She was part of a team of NPR journalists that received a first-place National Press Club award in 2019 for their coverage of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack.

McCammon is a native of Kansas City, Mo. She spent a semester studying at Oxford University in the U.K. while completing her undergraduate degree at Trinity College near Chicago.

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks during a news conference in Richmond, Va. on June 4. Virginia has rolled out a smartphone app to automatically notify people if they might have been exposed to the coronavirus. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Six states have an agreement to acquire fast-result antigen tests for the coronavirus. Here, a medical worker collects a sample after a patient self-administers a nasal swab test. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Hurricane Isaias Came Ashore Near North Carolina's Ocean Isle Beach

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Since Rep. Lewis' Death, Calls Grow To Rename Historic Bridge After Him

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Patrick Ellis worked at Howard University radio station for over 40 years. "He would play music that touched him," says one colleague. "He would play music that he knew touched his audience." WHUR hide caption

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WHUR

Remembering Radio Host Patrick Ellis, Who Brought The 'Gospel Spirit' To D.C.

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Crooked Hallelujah, by Kelli Jo Ford Grove Atlantic hide caption

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'Crooked Hallelujah' Sings Of Beauty And Trouble Between Mothers And Daughters

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Penguin

'Sex And Lies' Author Leila Slimani: 'Women's Lives Matter'

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Gonzalo Inclán and Enfrén Carreño of the Liceo Europeo school just outside of Madrid, Spain measure the space between desks in May. Miguel Pereira/Getty Images hide caption

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Is School Safe? Will Districts Test For COVID-19? Answering Back-To-School Questions

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What You Need To Know About Protective Face Masks

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Lt. Travis Stokes, a firefighter in Richmond, Va., is helping to lead an effort to distribute protective equipment to residents of low-income and minority neighborhoods. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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In Minority Neighborhoods, Knocking On Doors To Stop The Spread Of The Coronavirus

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