Sarah McCammon Sarah McCammon is a National Desk correspondent with NPR News.
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Sarah McCammon

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Sarah McCammon 2018
Kara Frame/NPR

Sarah McCammon

Correspondent, National Desk

Sarah McCammon is a correspondent covering the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast for NPR's National Desk. Her work focuses on political, social, and cultural divides in America, including abortion and reproductive rights, and the intersections of politics and religion.

During the 2016 election cycle, she was NPR's lead political reporter assigned to the Donald Trump campaign. In that capacity, she was a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast and reported on the GOP primary, the rise of the Trump movement, divisions within the Republican Party over the future of the GOP and the role of religion in those debates; that work earned her a rare invitation inside a closed-door meeting between evangelical leaders and Trump soon after he clinched the nomination.

Prior to joining NPR in 2015, McCammon reported for NPR member stations in Georgia, Iowa, and Nebraska, where she often hosted news magazines and talk shows. She's covered debates over oil pipelines in the Southeast and Midwest, agriculture and environmental issues in Nebraska, the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Iowa, and coastal environmental issues in Georgia.

McCammon began her journalism career as a newspaper reporter. She traces her interest in news back to childhood, when she would watch Sunday political shows – recorded on the VCR during church – with her father on Sunday afternoons. In 1998, she spent a semester serving as a U.S. Senate Page. She's received numerous regional and national journalism awards, including the Atlanta Press Club's "Excellence in Broadcast Radio Reporting" honor in 2015.

McCammon is a native of Kansas City, Mo. She spent a semester studying at Oxford University in the U.K. while completing her undergraduate degree at Trinity College near Chicago.

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Story Archive

Democratic Presidential Candidates Talk Abortion In South Carolina

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Natalie Lynch at a relative's home with her youngest child, Maycen. In 2014, when Lynch was pregnant with her older child, she spent two weeks before giving birth in a prison cell, mostly alone. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Pregnant, Locked Up, And Alone

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders talks to reporters outside the White House on April 29. President Trump said she would leave her job as press secretary at the end of June. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Press Secretary Sarah Sanders To Leave The White House

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Poll Shows Most Americans Support Abortion Rights, But With Some Limitations

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks at a news conference Saturday about the mass shooting in Virginia Beach the day before. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Virginia Beach Officials Confirm Gunman Sent In Resignation On Day Of Shooting

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11 People Killed In Virginia Beach Shooting, Suspected Gunman Dead

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Abortion-rights supporters take part in a protest Thursday in St. Louis. A state license that allows a Planned Parenthood health center in Missouri to perform abortions could soon expire. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Clinic That Performs Abortions Fights To Stay Open

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License For Missouri's Only Clinic That Performs Abortions Expires This Weekend

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Missouri Could Soon Be The Only U.S. State Without A Clinic That Provides Abortions

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Teresa Pettis (right), an abortion opponent, protests outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in St. Louis, on May 17. Unless a judge intervenes, health officials will force a Missouri facility to stop offering the procedure this week. Jim Salter/AP hide caption

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