Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

Story Archive

The black hole in the center of the Milky Way galaxy is captured in an image

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The 1st image of the supermassive black hole at our galactic center

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CDC says firearm-related homicides skyrocketed amid stresses of the pandemic

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More than 19,000 homicides in 2020 involved a firearm — an increase of nearly 5,000 from 2019. Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images

Firearm-related homicide rate skyrockets amid stresses of the pandemic, the CDC says

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NASA's Perseverance rover took this "selfie" next to a rock where it drilled for samples. NASA wants to bring samples collected by this rover back to Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA is bringing rocks back from Mars, but what if those samples contain alien life?

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An image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 as it flew by in January 1986. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

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Encore: A new bird flu is spreading in American birds and it may be here to stay

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A probe that will land on Saturn's moon Enceladus, seen here in false color, is one of the priorities outlined in the new report. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

NASA advisers call for a visit to Uranus, plus more science during moon landings

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Encore: Babies and toddlers know that swapping saliva is a sure sign of love

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Fossil footprints mistakenly attributed to bears were made by early humans

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Waterfowl and the raptors that dine on them, like this bald eagle and snow goose, have both been killed by the new bird flu virus. Jeff Goulden/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Goulden/Getty Images

A worrisome new bird flu is spreading in American birds and may be here to stay

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The Hubble Space Telescope has spotted the farthest star ever seen. The magnified galaxy looks like a stretched out red line with three dots. The single star is the middle one. NASA, ESA, Brian Welch (JHU), Dan Coe (STScI) hide caption

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NASA, ESA, Brian Welch (JHU), Dan Coe (STScI)

The light from this star that astronomers just spotted is 12.9 billion years old

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A boa constrictor feeds on a lizard in Tijuca Forest National Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Vitor Marigo / Aurora Photos/Getty Images/Aurora Open hide caption

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Vitor Marigo / Aurora Photos/Getty Images/Aurora Open

This trick keeps snakes from suffocating as they squeeze and swallow their prey

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Because space shuttle missions went up to repair and refurbish the Hubble Space Telescope, it has a relatively large carbon footprint compared to other telescopes. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Astronomy's contribution to climate change rivals the emissions from some countries

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