Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

Forged in 1879 and sanctioned by the General Conference on Weights and Measures at its first meeting, Le Grand K, the international prototype of the kilogram, has been kept under lock and key in a vault outside Paris. BIPM hide caption

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BIPM

Say Au Revoir To That Hunk Of Metal In France That Has Defined The Kilogram

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Arrangement of colored oviraptor-like eggs in an oviraptorid nest arrangement Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University hide caption

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Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue.

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

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A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. While most of the structures point in one direction, the red arrow shows that some point in the other direction. Courtesy of Abigail Allwood hide caption

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Courtesy of Abigail Allwood

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

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Smoke rises as first-stage boosters separate from a Soyuz rocket with a Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying a NASA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut. The mission was aborted shortly after launch, and the pair returned to Earth safely in an emergency landing. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

(Top row, from left) Titan, Earth's moon, Europa and Enceladus. (Bottom row, from left) Callisto, Charon, Ariel and lo. Courtesty of NASA hide caption

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Courtesty of NASA

Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making Moon

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Biochemical engineer Frances Arnold receives the Millennium Technology Prize 2016 during the awards ceremony in Helsinki, Finland. Arnold, an American, shares this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry with two others, another American, George P. Smith and the U.K.'s Sir Gregory P Winter. Heikki Saukkomaa/Lehtikuva via AP hide caption

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Heikki Saukkomaa/Lehtikuva via AP

Winners Of Nobel Prize In Chemistry Announced In Stockholm

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Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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A 17-year-old male bonobo eats while his son watches in the Lola Ya Bonobo Sanctuary, Democratic Republic of Congo. Fiona Rogers/Getty Images hide caption

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Fiona Rogers/Getty Images

What's Mine Is Yours, Sort Of: Bonobos And The Tricky Evolutionary Roots Of Sharing

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Migration corridors depend on maintaining both habitat connectivity and animals' knowledge of the landscape, demonstrated by these migrating bighorn sheep in Park County, Wyo. Travis Zaffarano Trailcam, Wyoming Migration Initiative/University of Wyoming hide caption

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Travis Zaffarano Trailcam, Wyoming Migration Initiative/University of Wyoming

Migration 101: It Doesn't Come Naturally For Moose And Sheep

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A 2-millimeter hole was found last week in a Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft (left) that is docked to the International Space Station. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

Who Caused The Mysterious Leak At The International Space Station?

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Chimps use sticks to poke into a mock termite mound to taste a sweet substance placed in the mound by keepers at Chimp Haven in Keithville, La. Today, caretakers say, more chimps in the U.S. live in accredited animal sanctuaries than in research facilities. Janet McConnaughey/AP hide caption

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Janet McConnaughey/AP

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

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Previous research has shown that babies in the first year of life understand that certain individuals tend to win in social conflicts — such as individuals that are physically larger, or that come from larger social groups. Rick Lowe/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Lowe/Getty Images

Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters

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