Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Stories By

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
NIAID/Science Source

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/359837446/360300799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza. Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358122198/358363573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The cruise ship Carnival Magic floats behind a catamaran off Cozumel, Mexico on Oct. 17. The ship skipped a planned stop there Friday, the cruise line says, after Mexican authorities delayed granting permission to dock. Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Reuters/Landov

Avian influenza, or bird flu, causes an infectious and contagious respiratory disease. In the lab, several scientists have made the H5N1 strain more contagious, a controversial line of research. James Cavallini/ScienceSource hide caption

toggle caption
James Cavallini/ScienceSource

The Ebola virus as seen under an electron microscope. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Why Won't The Fear Of Airborne Ebola Go Away?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356966590/357004656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ebola Virus Takes Center Stage In Washington

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356588444/356588445" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A stencil of an early human's hand in an Indonesian cave is estimated to be about 39,000 years old. Kinza Riza/Courtesy of Nature.com hide caption

toggle caption
Kinza Riza/Courtesy of Nature.com

Indonesian Cave Paintings As Old As Europe's Ancient Art

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/354166930/354639775" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient showed up with symptoms that were later confirmed to be Ebola. Mike Stone/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Stone/Getty Images

On The Alert For Ebola, Texas Hospital Still Missed First Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/353045095/353177282" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Health Officials Consider Blood Serum As Possible Ebola Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/352538366/352538368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biohazard suits used to handle dangerous microbes hang in a laboratory at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Fort Detrick, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/348768229/348768230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Health Officials Hope To Speed Up Possible Ebola Cures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/346137551/346137552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Proteins and enzymes that will produce antibodies for the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp are developed on the leaves of the nicotiana benthamiana plant, a relative of tobacco. Here, indicator proteins glow under ultraviolet light — a way to assess the success of bacteria spread. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Workers with the aid group Doctors Without Borders prepare a new Ebola treatment center near Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday. The facility has 120 beds, making it the largest Ebola isolation clinic in history. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

How Much Bigger Is The Ebola Outbreak Than Official Reports Show?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/341992005/342095408" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at the Nairobi airport on Thursday. Kenya has no reported cases of Ebola, but it's a transportation hub and so is on alert. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

A Virtual Outbreak Offers Hints Of Ebola's Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340346575/340422548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript