Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Trump's Nominee To Be The Next Head Of NASA Prepares For Senate Hearing

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Diagram of the path of a space rock from outside our solar system — the first ever observed. Brooks Bays / SOEST Publication Services / UH Institute for Astronomy hide caption

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Brooks Bays / SOEST Publication Services / UH Institute for Astronomy

D.C. Master Patrol Officer Benjamin Fettering shows a body camera worn in place of a normal radio microphone before a news conference in 2014. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Body Cam Study Shows No Effect On Police Use Of Force Or Citizen Complaints

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Macaques are social animals, whether in a group enclosure like this one at the Gelsenkircen zoo in western Germany, or in the wild. But many research monkeys are still housed in separate cages. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

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The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

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Adult female with young male coming in (without collar) to her kill. Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science hide caption

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Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science

Pumas Are Not Such Loners After All

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Light Pollution Can Impact Nocturnal Bird Migration

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Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To Researchers Who Improved 'Imaging Of Biomolecules'

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Chemistry Nobel Prize Awarded For Advances In Cell Imaging

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Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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Experiments that showed how to make the H5N1 bird flu virus more contagious raised concern about malicious misuse of laboratory research. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

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