Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Artist's rendering of how the first stars in the universe may have looked. N.R.Fuller/National Science Foundation/Nature hide caption

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N.R.Fuller/National Science Foundation/Nature

Did Dark Matter Make The Early Universe Chill Out?

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A Przewalski mare with her foal at the Highland Wildlife Park in Kingussie, Scotland, in 2013. It turns out that Przewalski's horses are actually feral descendants of the first horses that humans are known to have domesticated, around 5,500 years ago. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Why The Last 'Wild' Horses Really Aren't

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Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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Space Enthusiasts Gather In Florida As Powerful Rocket Is Set To Launch

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The Falcon Heavy is the latest advance from the rocket company SpaceX, and it's a step toward the company's goal of sending people to Mars. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Set To Launch World's Most Powerful Rocket

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Night Light Increasing Around The World

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Two bonobos play fight at the Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2012. Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Unlike Humans, Bonobos Shun Helpers And Befriend The Bullies

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Leandro Teixeira and Richard Dubielzig of the University of Wisconsin - Madison open the whale eye package. Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison hide caption

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Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison

All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye

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Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark a pandemic outbreak. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse

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Insights Into The Extinction Of The Passenger Pigeon

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Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

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