Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

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Why Scientists Hope To Inject Some People With Zika Virus

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo

Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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While some scientists seek ways to stop the spread of Zika by mosquitoes, others have received new funding from the National Institutes of Health to track the genes and habits of the virus itself. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Virus Profilers Race To Figure Out What Makes Zika Tick

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When so-called senescent cells were removed from mice, they were healthier and lived longer than mice that still had the cells. Philippe Merle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Merle/AFP/Getty Images

Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter

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A view from Earth of a slender crescent moon in close proximity to the two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter. Justin Lane/epa/Corbis hide caption

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Justin Lane/epa/Corbis

Track Jupiter's Path Like An Ancient Babylonian

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The dark red color and looming posture of this Octopus tetricus likely signals menace to another octopus nearby, say scientists who studied 186 octopus interactions in 52 hours of underwater video. David Scheel/Current Biology hide caption

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David Scheel/Current Biology

Shifting Colors Of An Octopus May Hint At A Rich, Nasty Social Life

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Ikon Images/Corbis

A Judge's Guidance Makes Jurors Suspicious Of Any Eyewitness

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The imagined view from Planet Nine back toward the sun. Astronomers think the huge, distant planet is likely gaseous, similar to Uranus and Neptune. Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

Scientists Find Hints Of A Giant, Hidden Planet In Our Solar System

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An artist's impression of the superluminous supernova as it would appear from a planet in the same galaxy, about 10,000 light-years away. The exploding star is 570 billion times brighter than our sun. Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science hide caption

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Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science

Record-Busting Star Explosion Baffles Sky Watchers

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The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, which causes MERS, is one of the microbes that has sparked research controversy. NIAID/CDC hide caption

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NIAID/CDC

Debate Over Bird Flu Research Moratorium Flares Up Again

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Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Simone Golob/Corbis

Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

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U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, and Kathryn Sullivan, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have been tangling for months over the legitimacy of a climate study NOAA scientists published in Science. Drew Angerer/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Is This Congressman's Oversight An Effort To Hobble Climate Science?

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Climate models project 21st century global temperatures. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA Center for Climate Simulation hide caption

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NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA Center for Climate Simulation

Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

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A view of the opening of COP21 on climate change Monday in Paris. More than 150 world leaders are meeting for the 21st Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images

Zach Whitener, research associate at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, holds a cod while collecting samples for a study. Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Why Is It So Hard To Save Gulf Of Maine Cod? They're In Hot Water

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