Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Spraying sea salt into the atmosphere to increase the reflective cloud cover over oceans is the way some scientists think they might be able to bring down Earth's temperature. At least they'd like to safely test the idea on a small scale. Pixza/Getty Images hide caption

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Pixza/Getty Images

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

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The American Iron and Steel Institute is one of the trade groups that wants Congress to undo the stronger safety regulation enacted in 2016 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Congress May Undo Rule That Pushes Firms To Keep Good Safety Records

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NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 monitors how the climate is changing. Trump's budget would eliminate some satellites, including OCO-3, a next-generation carbon-monitoring spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Trump's Budget Slashes Climate Change Funding

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An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

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Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

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SpaceX Moves To Launch First-Ever Private Mission To The Moon

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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This artist's rendering shows what one of the seven planets, TRAPPIST-1f, might look like. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Astronomers Find 7 Earth-Size Planets Around A Nearby Star

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The Apollo 11 command module Columbia sits in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar in Virginia, where it is undergoing conservation. Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Australian pitcher plant repurposed some of its genes in order to digest bugs. Natalie McNear/Flickr hide caption

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Natalie McNear/Flickr

Carnivorous Plants Around The Globe Use Similar Deadly Tricks

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For the first time, scientists have synthesized a three-stranded molecular braid that twisted into a knot with eight crossings, as in this rendering. Stuart Jantzen/Biocinematics.com/Science hide caption

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Stuart Jantzen/Biocinematics.com/Science

Scientists Have Twisted Molecules Into The Tightest Knot Ever

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The killer whale J2, better known as "Granny," pokes her head out of the water in the Salish Sea near the San Juan Islands of Washington in July 2016. Granny, who was thought to be about 105 years old at the time, was presumed to have died later that year. Mark Malleson/Center for Whale Research/AP hide caption

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Mark Malleson/Center for Whale Research/AP

Menopause Mystery: Why Do Female Killer Whales Experience The Change Of Life?

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NASA Faces The Unknown In Preparing For Trump Administration

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Scientists Ponder Whether Our Universe Is The Only One That Exists

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