Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Stories By

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Scientist Corey Gray and his mother, Sharon Yellowfly, are pictured at one of the two massive detectors that make up the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. One facility, where Gray works, is in Washington state, and the other is in Louisiana. Courtesy of Russell Barber hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Russell Barber

How A Cosmic Collision Sparked A Native American Translator's Labor Of Love

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706032203/708599988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Salt Institute spent decades questioning government efforts to limit Americans' sodium intake. Critics say the institute muddied the links between salt and health. Now it has shut its doors. ATU Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ATU Images/Getty Images

After A Century, A Voice For The U.S. Salt Industry Goes Quiet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707747077/708302468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706838786/707722650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How The First All-Female Spacewalk Could Be Foiled By A Spacesuit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706969363/706969364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory is made up of two detectors, this one in Livingston, La., and one near Hanford, Wash. The detectors use giant arms in the shape of an "L" to measure tiny ripples in the fabric of the universe. Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab hide caption

toggle caption
Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab

Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/701498785/704700606" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this illustration, SpaceX's Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station for docking. The capsule has room to carry seven astronauts. SpaceX/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
SpaceX/NASA

SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698073318/699119078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. The landing site at Tranquility Base has remained mostly untouched — though that could change as more nations and even commercial companies start to explore the moon. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

How Do You Preserve History On The Moon?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696129505/696532423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
William Lovelace/Getty Images

The Power Of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Anger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691298594/696413704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A white-tailed deer keeps its ears open while grazing in South Hero, Vt. Rob Swanson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Swanson/AP

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693905954/695420319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ariel Davis for NPR

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689747637/691221630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bit of lapis lazuli — a rich blue pigment — is trapped within a central tooth's dental tartar on this lower jaw of a European woman who died sometime between A.D. 997 and 1162. Christina Warinner/Science Advances hide caption

toggle caption
Christina Warinner/Science Advances

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/683283982/683732144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biological Cartographers Seek To Map The Trillions Of Cells In The Human Body

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682394195/682394196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Look At The Methodical Plan China Has Laid Out For Space Exploration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682021509/682021510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This enhanced color image of Ultima Thule was taken at a distance of 85,000 miles and highlights its reddish surface. The image on the right has a far higher spatial resolution. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute