Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

U.N. Brokers Global Effort To Rein In Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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U.N. Holds Climate Talks In New York Ahead Of Paris Meeting

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One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement. Alistair Everett/Swansea University hide caption

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Alistair Everett/Swansea University

Study Reveals What Happens During A 'Glacial Earthquake'

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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The long "oral arms" of the adult moon jelly, Aurelia aurita, extend from near its mouth, in the center of the bell. Magnus Manske/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Magnus Manske/Wikimedia Commons

Instead Of Replacing Missing Body Parts, Moon Jellies Recycle

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An artist's conception of how Saturn's immense Phoebe ring might appear to eyes sensitive to infrared wavelengths. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Saturn's Dark And Mysterious Outer Ring Is Even Bigger Than Expected

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A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

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C. S. Goldsmith/CDC

How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

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Gustav Dejert/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Editing The Climate Talkers: Punctuation's Effect On Earth's Fate

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One of these things is not like the other: A 3-D printed model of a beige cowbird egg stands out from its robin's egg nest mates, though their shape and heft are similar. Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber hide caption

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Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber

Higher-Tech Fake Eggs Offer Better Clues To Wild-Bird Behavior

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This fungus among us — baker's yeast, aka Saccharomyces cerevisiae — is useful for more than just making bread. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

You And Yeast Have More In Common Than You Might Think

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The most recent common ancestor of all today's snakes likely lived 120 million years ago. Scientists believe it used needle-like hooked teeth to grab rodent-like creatures that it then swallowed whole. Julius Csotonyi/BMC Evolutionary Biology hide caption

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Julius Csotonyi/BMC Evolutionary Biology

Earth's First Snake Likely Evolved On Land, Not In Water

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The skull of a chicken embryo (left) has a recognizable beak. But when scientists block the expression of two particular genes, the embryo develops a rounded "snout" (center) that looks something like an alligator's skull (right). Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar hide caption

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Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar

How Bird Beaks Got Their Start As Dinosaur Snouts

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ADP Co-chairs Daniel Reifsnyder (left) and Ahmed Djoghlaf (center) say their negotiation work is difficult but worth it. "We only have one planet, you know," Reifsnyder says. "We have to protect it." Courtesy of IISD/ENB hide caption

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Courtesy of IISD/ENB

Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action

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Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea. R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway hide caption

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R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

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Humans have influenced Earth's history for thousands of years, though some scientists count changes of the last two centuries as especially notable. (Left to right) Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images; Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Liszt Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images; Joint Task Force One/AP hide caption

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(Left to right) Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images; Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Liszt Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images; Joint Task Force One/AP

When Did Humans Start Shaping Earth's Fate? An Epoch Debate

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