Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

Delegates took their seats during the plenary session at the Bonn climate change conference on March 10, 2014. Negotiations resume this week; by the end of the year, the U.N. hopes to have forged a new global agreement. UNclimatechange/Flickr hide caption

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UNclimatechange/Flickr

How Are U.N. Climate Talks Like A Middle School? Cliques Rule

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Male and female tungara frogs. Among these frogs, the guy with the best call usually wins the gal — except when you throw a third-choice loser into the mix. Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life hide caption

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Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life

Froggy Went A-Courtin', But Lady Frogs Chose Second-Best Guy Instead

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How Dorothy Parker's Ashes Ended Up In Baltimore

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A brown bear in its natural habitat. Wildlife ecologists in Minnesota found that black bears in their study experienced an increase in heart rate when buzzed by drones. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Drones Increase Heart Rates Of Wild Bears. Too Much Stress?

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A juvenile California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides). Michael LaBarbera/Nature hide caption

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Michael LaBarbera/Nature

Octopus Genome Offers Insights Into One Of Ocean's Cleverest Oddballs

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Astronomers Present New Research On The Aging Universe

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Can you guess which eyes belong to what animal? Top row, from left: cuttlefish, lion, goat. Bottom row, from left: domestic cat, horse, gecko. Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr hide caption

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Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr

Eye Shapes Of The Animal World Hint At Differences In Our Lifestyles

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Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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How 3-D Printing Helps Scientists Understand Bird Behavior

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Life reconstruction of Wendiceratops pinhorn. Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE hide caption

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Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE

Scientists Discover One Of The Oldest Horned Dinosaurs

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Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say. Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University

Checking DNA Against Elephants Hints At How Mammoths Got Woolly

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U.N. Brokers Global Effort To Rein In Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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U.N. Holds Climate Talks In New York Ahead Of Paris Meeting

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One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement. Alistair Everett/Swansea University hide caption

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Alistair Everett/Swansea University

Study Reveals What Happens During A 'Glacial Earthquake'

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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