Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Chimps use sticks to poke into a mock termite mound to taste a sweet substance placed in the mound by keepers at Chimp Haven in Keithville, La. Today, caretakers say, more chimps in the U.S. live in accredited animal sanctuaries than in research facilities. Janet McConnaughey/AP hide caption

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Janet McConnaughey/AP

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

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Previous research has shown that babies in the first year of life understand that certain individuals tend to win in social conflicts — such as individuals that are physically larger, or that come from larger social groups. Rick Lowe/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Lowe/Getty Images

Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters

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Artist's concept of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Launching in 2018, Parker Solar Probe will provide new data on solar activity and make critical contributions to our ability to forecast major space-weather events that impact life on Earth. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun

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NASA has named nine astronauts to crew the first test flights and missions of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule. From left to right: Sunita Williams, Josh Cassada, Eric Boe, Nicole Mann, Christopher Ferguson, Douglas Hurley, Robert Behnken, Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover. NASA hide caption

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NASA
sorbetto/Getty Images

What Makes A Leader?

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Keeper Zachariah Mutai attends in March to Fatu, one of only two female northern white rhinos left in the world, in the pen where she is kept for observation, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya. Scientists have successfully grown hybrid white rhino embryos in the lab, stoking hopes that a purebred northern white rhino could be implanted in a surrogate. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Scientists Hope Lab-Grown Embryos Can Save Rhino Species From Extinction

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Modern tools of biology could allow someone to recreate a dangerous virus, such as smallpox, from scratch. Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'

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Using card with black symbols, researchers trained honeybees to understand that sugar water would always be located under a card with the least number of symbols — including when presented with a card that was totally blank. Don Farrall/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Farrall/Getty Images

Math Bee: Honeybees Seem To Understand The Notion Of Zero

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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An artist's rendering of the Chicxulub impact crater on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula from an asteroid that slammed into the planet some 65 million years ago. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Asteroid Impact That Wiped Out The Dinosaurs Also Caused Abrupt Global Warming

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Since early 2013, 110 chimpanzees have been retired to Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. That's the largest group of government-owned chimps ever sent to sanctuary. Sabrina, seen here, arrived at Chimp Haven in 2013. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society

The prehensile tailed skink from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea has green blood due to high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin. The green bile pigment in the blood overwhelms the intense crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a striking lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?

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