Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Health Officials Consider Blood Serum As Possible Ebola Treatment

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Biohazard suits used to handle dangerous microbes hang in a laboratory at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Fort Detrick, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

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Health Officials Hope To Speed Up Possible Ebola Cures

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Proteins and enzymes that will produce antibodies for the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp are developed on the leaves of the nicotiana benthamiana plant, a relative of tobacco. Here, indicator proteins glow under ultraviolet light — a way to assess the success of bacteria spread. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Workers with the aid group Doctors Without Borders prepare a new Ebola treatment center near Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday. The facility has 120 beds, making it the largest Ebola isolation clinic in history. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

How Much Bigger Is The Ebola Outbreak Than Official Reports Show?

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Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at the Nairobi airport on Thursday. Kenya has no reported cases of Ebola, but it's a transportation hub and so is on alert. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

A Virtual Outbreak Offers Hints Of Ebola's Future

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An outbreak of bird flu in India in 2008 prompted authorities to temporarily ban the sale of poultry. Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images

Biologists Choose Sides In Safety Debate Over Lab-Made Pathogens

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Ethics Panel Endorses The Use Of Experimental Drugs To Slow Ebola

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems

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Early days: NASA's International Sun-Earth Explorer C (also known as ISEE-3 and ICE) was undergoing testing and evaluation inside the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber when this photo was snapped in 1976. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Little Spacecraft That Couldn't

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With a comet fly-by and a solar orbit behind it, ISEE-3 has now revved its engines for a swing past the moon. Mark Maxwell/Courtesy ISEE-3 Reboot Project hide caption

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Mark Maxwell/Courtesy ISEE-3 Reboot Project

A 6-foot-long electric eel is basically a 6-inch fish attached to a 5-1/2-foot cattle prod, researchers say. The long tail is packed with special cells that pump electricity without shocking the fish. Mark Newman/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image hide caption

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Mark Newman/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image

A Shocking Fish Tale Surprises Evolutionary Biologists

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By comparing "Skull 17" from the Sima de los Huesos site with many others found in the same cave, researchers were able to discern the common facial features of the era. Javier Trueba /Madrid Scientific Films hide caption

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Javier Trueba /Madrid Scientific Films

How To Become A Neanderthal: Chew Before Thinking

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